Thread: Full Spectrum Komodo with Drop-In OLPFs

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  1. #1 Full Spectrum Komodo with Drop-In OLPFs 
    Member GrahamClark's Avatar
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    I love the otherworldly look of IR, so as a personal project today I finished converting a couple Komodo's to full spectrum to shoot IR, and a drop-in Komodo OLPF so I could return to default color in seconds, check it out:



    For my photography cameras I've had to commit to converting a camera (5D's) to IR and then itís dedicated to IR.

    I had bought a couple Komodoís just for this purpose. Then it occurred to me that converting it to full spectrum and doing drop-in OLPFs (Iíll call them CSFs for Color Science Filter, since itís a drop-in filter, going forward) would be faster and way less expensive.

    The result of the experiment is being able to shoot in IR, and within seconds switch back to default Komodo color science.

    The DSMC1/2 has a user replaceable CSF Ė when I saw that I thought that was one of the greatest camera inventions. I wish stills cameras had that!

    Being able to switch between various CSFs is great, being able to shoot in IR or Skin Tone, Low Light, Standard is so cool.

    The Komodo has a non-removable fixed CSF, so I manufactured a full spectrum CSF of identical dimensions (SCHOTT B270/Clear) and installed this in place of the existing CSF. (Warranty voided.)

    The Komodo became a Full Spectrum Komodo. Shooting natively it has IR pollution, as the built-in CSF eliminates all IR, even into a bit into visible.

    Next, I made a ďKomodo Drop-In CSFĒ, matching the spectral curve of the default built-in CSF, so I can return it back to default color with a simple drop-in filter.



    The experience switching between IR & visible feels kind of like 2 cameras in 1, itís really fun.

    Itís just a personal project, IR is not for everyone.

    IR can add an otherworldly quality to black & white landscape photography, so I canít wait to film in IR alongside when I shoot stills.

    I love being able to quickly switch lenses between my R5 / Komodo, keeping a wide angle on one, and a telephoto on another, all in a small 20L backpack.

    Since itís a possibility someone may ask, I cannot convert cameras, this was just a fun project, I had no idea if it was even going to work, but I'm glad it did!

    NOTE: This was in no way connected with RED, approved by RED, and yes I knew before converting my camera it would void my warranty.
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member Brandon Veen's Avatar
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    It’s very cool to see this being done, the ability to drop back into Visible especially seems fitting and almost better than the DSMC1/2 way of doing things (at least in a test environment where going back and forth quickly is desirable). I just tested out Xelmus Apollos in IR last week and as there wasn’t a way to switch back to STH easily just had to make due with grabbing a full spectrum shot for comparison.

    For actual filmmaking use, I wonder if it makes more sense to use rear-ND and front IR filters, or the opposite. I suppose if you have the quick ability to switch back to visible, probably Rear-IR and front NDs’ just to keep it simple. I can’t help but think front IR seems like a more appealing choice in most instances, as NDs’ could change for each and every shot, and something small could be good for quicker filter swaps, but during a scene you’re likely not to change IR filters unless the sequence demands it.

    A lot of the time with IR I find I’m just trying to grab stills or stitch panoramas, where shutter speed doesn’t need to be at 1/48, and in those instances this definitely seems like a great system for that. For really large front diameter glass, rear IR definitely has its appeal since nobody is making 6.6”x6.6” sized IR filters anyway. I also could see a rear UV bandpass being extremely useful, assuming Komodo in full spectrum mode can similarly pass UV from 300-380nm’s like the DSMC sensors. The Kolari 58mm filter has been quite limiting in this regard, even though it’d still be a hunt for a cine lens with good UV transmission even if it was 4x5.65”.

    I will say this does feels like a missed opportunity to engrave a slightly script/italic typeface “infra” on top of the RED logo ala the signature primes. I’m glad to see it working though, I don’t doubt this allows for much more agile shooting compared to a 14 lb DSMC rig.
    Brandon Veen | Digital Curator at Hedderich's
    Epic-X Dragon #08127 + Fujifilm GFX50R + Leica BLK360
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member DC Chavez's Avatar
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    Very cool Graham...

    Maybe its time to reshoot this- with a global shutter... :)

    Los Angeles | http://www.dcchavez.com | Komodo ST #117 | Helium 8K S35 #6284 | Helium 8K S35 #4573 | @dcchavez
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Ketch Rossi's Avatar
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    Graham,
    That looks awesome and so does that KIT!!!
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Ketch Rossi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DC Chavez View Post
    Very cool Graham...

    Maybe its time to reshoot this- with a global shutter... :)

    Yeah that will bring those screaming rolling tires to a new dimension of cool :)
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  6. #6  
    Member GrahamClark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon Veen View Post
    I wonder if it makes more sense to use rear-ND and front IR filters, or the opposite. I suppose if you have the quick ability to switch back to visible, probably Rear-IR and front NDs’ just to keep it simple.
    either way, or they can be combined into a single glass element, such as IR CPL, either circular or drop-in, for convenience sake.

    or even a IR 720 VND with a yellow CPL on the front.

    cross-polarization is surprisingly effective with ND in IR

    what effect would you go for from 300-380?
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  7. #7  
    Member GrahamClark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DC Chavez View Post
    Very cool Graham...

    Maybe its time to reshoot this- with a global shutter... :)

    Wow, you KILLED it with that shot in IR

    clouds seem too have more clarity , even ones which aren't visually perceptible

    looks like the same holds true of the smoke
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  8. #8  
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    Damn!!
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member Nick Morrison's Avatar
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    This is VERY cool.
    Nick Morrison
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    smallgiant.tv
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  10. #10  
    Senior Member DC Chavez's Avatar
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    Thanks Graham. This was with the Kipper Tie DSMC1 OLPF and I believe a 890nm filter...
    Los Angeles | http://www.dcchavez.com | Komodo ST #117 | Helium 8K S35 #6284 | Helium 8K S35 #4573 | @dcchavez
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