Thread: The Psychology Of Color Grading & Its Emotional Impact On Your Audience

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  1. #11  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Karim,


    I think most people think, "well that guy's movie got alot of attention and notoriety maybe I can just do what that guy did an get the same amount of attention". "I don't have his skill or his talent, maybe if I just copy the look of his film that will be enough".
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    COLOR PSYCHOLOGY


    By LidiaSeara


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  3. #13  
    Senior Member Mark A. Jaeger's Avatar
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    Rand,
    Thanks for posting this informative material. I thought I understood color theory pretty well but there was definitely more here and I like that.
    Best regards, Mark

    PS: It may be understatement but it would seem that Karim didn't find this post as interesting as I did.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    You're Welcome Mark!

    I think I've learned from the articles and Videos I've posted that it's not so much about getting a perfect looking image but how you can further help convey the filmmaker's intent with every individual graded image.
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  5. #15  
    Senior Member Mark A. Jaeger's Avatar
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    Subtle shifts in color make a huge difference in the reaction by the viewer. Even in landscape and wildlife a little tweak makes a difference in how the image is regarded. Sometimes the grade is just bringing the captured image closer to the videographer's perception of what the scene looked like. But other times a goal reaction is what one wants.

    I know the Matrix trilogy was heavily graded to create a perception/reaction in the viewer. It just happened to use the teal/orange scheme. Many, many view the trilogy without realizing there was a grade applied. They simply watch and react. I am certain this was the goal and it is accomplished through skillful knowledge of psychology and art.

    As a shout out to you - I don't know how much time you spend on the web but I expect "a lot" and that effort is much appreciated when you forward/share what you find. The topics all circle around the general theme of video/photography but sometimes something comes in from the outer planets that opens a new door to "interesting". A simple sum is "thanks a lot".
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  6. #16  
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    I found this webinar to be incredibly insightful, especially on topics you don't see discussed very often around colour and individual perception.

    https://mixinglight.com/color-gradin...ocess-webinar/


    JB

    (I'm a paid up user of mixing light, but this webinar seems to be free)
    John Brawley ACS
    Cinematographer
    Los Angeles
    www.johnbrawley.com
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A. Jaeger View Post
    Subtle shifts in color make a huge difference in the reaction by the viewer. Even in landscape and wildlife a little tweak makes a difference in how the image is regarded. Sometimes the grade is just bringing the captured image closer to the videographer's perception of what the scene looked like. But other times a goal reaction is what one wants.

    I know the Matrix trilogy was heavily graded to create a perception/reaction in the viewer. It just happened to use the teal/orange scheme. Many, many view the trilogy without realizing there was a grade applied. They simply watch and react. I am certain this was the goal and it is accomplished through skillful knowledge of psychology and art.

    As a shout out to you - I don't know how much time you spend on the web but I expect "a lot" and that effort is much appreciated when you forward/share what you find. The topics all circle around the general theme of video/photography but sometimes something comes in from the outer planets that opens a new door to "interesting". A simple sum is "thanks a lot".

    Mark Thanks Again! I spend alot of time trying to learn from the internet as well as other places so that I can always further improve my skills. My thing is I want to be better than I was a year ago, a month ago, a day ago, an hour ago. I never can understand those people who simply just want to just be good enough and nothing more. I always try to share from all of places I've gathered info from so that others can learn what I learned or even more.
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  8. #18  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Brawley View Post
    I found this webinar to be incredibly insightful, especially on topics you don't see discussed very often around colour and individual perception.

    https://mixinglight.com/color-gradin...ocess-webinar/


    JB

    (I'm a paid up user of mixing light, but this webinar seems to be free)
    Thanks John for the link!
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  9. #19  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Secrets of color-grading in photography


    This says Photography but this could also be applied in cinema.


    By
    Joanna Kustra


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  10. #20  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    COLOR THEORY for Filmmakers


    By
    CINEMATICJ


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