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  1. #251  
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    Sorry Eric, I just don't share your (as I perceive it) pessimism.

    If the world is a mess, get out there and change it. You don't need wealth, though it helps, of course it helps. It's been my experience that the greatest help and change comes from one on one interaction. One person plus one persone plus one person... and so on. Start with the guy next door to you. See if he needs any help. Mow his lawn. Wash his car. Cook him a meal. Then watch the look on his face as he is inspired to do the same thing for someone else.

    A flood starts with a rain drop.
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  2. #252  
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    If you try to manufacture a commoditized product in the US of A, you are pretty much dead before you start. RED cameras and pretty much everything RED builds is far from that. So this model likely will work for RED.
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  3. #253  
    Senior Member Denizhan Nacar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jannard View Post
    One of the problems I see is that young vision guns get bought up early by VC's and don't have a chance to take it all the way. Many take the 1st $20M they are offered after a year of work and go to Tahiti.

    Jim
    Any examples?
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  4. #254  
    Moderator David Battistella's Avatar
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    The VC money is all about generating money. Passion, people, etc are only useful if it generates dollars. When a company makes a shift into feeding the VC money then often the focus shifts as well.

    Let's face it it's pretty hard for young people or a young company to turn away 20 mil. and there aren't alot of people willing to pay 20 million and continue to mentor and nurture that.

    At that stage the purchase is either to enhance your enterprise or cut the head off something that threatens you.

    In any case some people leave a legacy by creating a fund. I always thought that Derek Sivers, the guy who invented CD baby did it right. He took what he needed, converted the company to a charitable organization sold it for 20 million tax free and uses that 20 million to give grants to support music students.

    Is that greedy? No. Is it good? I'm not one to judge that but when a person turns 20 million, money the could have taken themselves, and creates something that has a direct effect on people lives and culture, that's pretty impressive.

    David
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  5. #255  
    Senior Member Eric Lange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris Anderson View Post
    Sorry Eric, I just don't share your (as I perceive it) pessimism.

    If the world is a mess, get out there and change it. You don't need wealth, though it helps, of course it helps. It's been my experience that the greatest help and change comes from one on one interaction. One person plus one persone plus one person... and so on. Start with the guy next door to you. See if he needs any help. Mow his lawn. Wash his car. Cook him a meal. Then watch the look on his face as he is inspired to do the same thing for someone else.

    A flood starts with a rain drop.



    Well Kris, Australia is a nice place, and I’m glad that you don’t share my “pessimism”. I try to think of it a as realism...?

    I think the micro loans program is the closest that we will ever get to buying the world a puppy.

    So as I said I had adopted my daughter from Vietnam almost ten years ago, love her to bits (I have a bio son too). Years ago we actually tried to set an Orphanage up out there (mainly focused on children that have birth defects from (still) agent orange from the Vietnamese wars), and have been very active in other countries for similar reasons. Basically you could say that been there done that and bought the “T” shirt (made for $0.0003).


    So no matter how “noble” the cause or otherwise as soon as you turn up with a dollar in your pocket there are 50 people all lined up that are on the make at every level to get their cut. In a communist country you still have an oppressive and restrictive regime (that has the ultimate power to stop anything), then you have the corrupt higher level officials, then the corrupt local officials and then you have a whole chain of crooks in between. It’s not that folks in these countries are morally bankrupt; it’s just that there is not a system of law that protects the individual or any other entity regardless of size or nationality.


    The (Italian)/venetians in the 1300’s had figured out that a very cohesive and strict code of law would HAVE to be set up if “international” commerce and trade was going to be successful and stable and able to grow and prosper. Fast forward to today and the China of today. I have friends and colleagues that are manufacturing relatively simple items (such as machine tools) over there. These are more than widgets but much less than less than the latest ground breaking tech. For real high tech, China is a nightmare as there is no practical system of law that protects or respects intellectual property of any kind. Basically all of your best R&D efforts are basically stolen (period). I.e. they did not pay to develop such technologies in the first place. This is absolute theft, and there is absolutely no recourse what so ever. To add insult to injury a cheap “knock off” is the likely outcome; this is hard enough to defend on US soil, but absolutely impossible in China itself. This is not good. If they had a system that respected IP things would be VERY different.


    What Jim is suggesting I think is that US companies DO have a responsibility to hang onto US assets. The reality is that world economics and business go hand in hand (obviously) and also (obviously) political and national security are also directly affected. Anyone that has studied the history of the 20th century even in the most cursory way will understand the link between economic stability and “world” stability and security. Right now the Chinese are holding onto more dollars than they know what the hell to do with. The US is in greater debt than ever before, and has borrowed to a ridiculous degree from China. China has had its eye on Taiwan for several decades now (actually really Jonesing to grab it). Basically if the borrowing and debt situation gets worse then the US will be totally behind the 8 ball; totally powerless to say “Oi, China, you can’t march into Taiwan”; the Chinese will of course, and the US won’t be able to lift a finger in its defense as we owe the Chinese Trillions of dollars....…And we are already up to the neck and maxed out on “perpetual” war in other regions of the world

    People talk about the butterfly effect; in essence the way we do business (today) does in fact determine the fate of nations. One might ponder if that should be so or allowed to happen in the first place? Unfortunately it’s a massive double standard that Chinese companies if they wish can file IP in the United Sates and have the benefit of one the world’s best legal systems, and yet if we try to do the same in China, you are absolutely screwed. I think it’s a huge mistake to believe that we are all playing by the same rules,… we are not. If I was Taiwanese I would be very worried right now.

    The world is a mess especially in developing countries as there are no real systems of law that protect the individual. I think this is one of the things we take for granted in the US or don’t fully appreciate.


    Eric
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  6. #256  
    Senior Member Elsie N's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Lange View Post
    ...

    ...China is a nightmare as there is no practical system of law that protects or respects intellectual property of any kind. Basically all of your best R&D efforts are basically stolen (period). I.e. they did not pay to develop such technologies in the first place. This is absolute theft, and there is absolutely no recourse what so ever. To add insult to injury a cheap “knock off” is the likely outcome; this is hard enough to defend on US soil, but absolutely impossible in China itself. This is not good. If they had a system that respected IP things would be VERY different. ...
    ...


    Eric
    This part of your post has left me wondering where on earth Epic M 00006 is. I was convinced from the start that camera was purposely stolen. Pity the poor buyer who buys a knockoff Epic. While it may look like an Epic on the outside, it will probably have 1080p guts.

    You may scoff at the idea of a knockoff Epic, but it is my understanding there is an Asian pseudo Segway being sold.
    One camera is a shoot...but four (or more'-) Hydrogens is a prohhhh-duction... Elsie the Wraith
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  7. #257  
    Senior Member Detlev Eller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jannard View Post
    One of the problems I see is that young vision guns get bought up early by VC's and don't have a chance to take it all the way. Many take the 1st $20M they are offered after a year of work and go to Tahiti.

    Jim

    ... quite frankly .... i am tempted to do the same .... and buy boatloads of RED gear ... hehe

    :-)
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  8. #258  
    Senior Member Eric Lange's Avatar
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    I was raised and educated in the UK, at a very Victorian boarding school. We still had maps on the wall that showed the extent of the “British Empire” (circa 1900), i.e. huge and numerous regions of RED daubed all over the world map. “The Sun never sets on the British Empire”…. [Obviously the “grabbed up” British Empire was not the most politically correct institution in the world at that time but it was by far the most powerful]. So world events with the first and second world war, basically turned a lion into a whimpering mouse in less than 35 years. US manufacturing benefited tremendously by being physically remote and therefore virtually un-bombable.

    A bit like the sentiment of what John Bannister was saying in his post. Don’t make the mistake in thinking that the US is this unsinkable battle ship (MCain “the fundamentals of the economy …”, a Lion can be (permanently) reduced to a mouse in a matter of a few decades. The Chinese were at the brunt of British Imperialism (the Chinese still make movies about it today); The Chinese do have more than a handsome collection of axes to grind, and if they see the opportunity they will go for it.

    I honestly believe that this is the last chance that the US has to get it right. I think we (the US) have made a substantial number of “market” driven mistakes; time to re-think.

    I am very greatful that Jim has taken the time to share his insights and understanding of the ways we need to go.

    Ta.

    Eric
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  9. #259  
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Lange View Post
    I was raised and educated in the UK, at a very Victorian boarding school. We still had maps on the wall that showed the extent of the “British Empire” (circa 1900), i.e. huge and numerous regions of RED daubed all over the world map. “The Sun never sets on the British Empire”…. [Obviously the “grabbed up” British Empire was not the most politically correct institution in the world at that time but it was by far the most powerful]. So world events with the first and second world war, basically turned a lion into a whimpering mouse in less than 35 years. US manufacturing benefited tremendously by being physically remote and therefore virtually un-bombable.

    A bit like the sentiment of what John Bannister was saying in his post. Don’t make the mistake in thinking that the US is this unsinkable battle ship (MCain “the fundamentals of the economy …”, a Lion can be (permanently) reduced to a mouse in a matter of a few decades. The Chinese were at the brunt of British Imperialism (the Chinese still make movies about it today); The Chinese do have more than a handsome collection of axes to grind, and if they see the opportunity they will go for it.

    I honestly believe that this is the last chance that the US has to get it right. I think we (the US) have made a substantial number of “market” driven mistakes; time to re-think.

    I am very greatful that Jim has taken the time to share his insights and understanding of the ways we need to go.

    Ta.

    Eric
    Here Here !!!
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  10. #260  
    Senior Member D Fuller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jannard View Post
    One of the problems I see is that young vision guns get bought up early by VC's and don't have a chance to take it all the way. Many take the 1st $20M they are offered after a year of work and go to Tahiti.

    Jim
    I think this is the most important barrier to economic recovery at work today, and it's a real structural problem. A 20-something or 30-something entrepreneur gets offered so much cash that it's hard to refuse, then the company is controlled by people who don't have the passion for the business that grew it. The VCs are interested in harvesting all the money they can as fast as they can, so they look to a "China strategy" to deliver maximum short-term profit margins. Along the way, two things are lost: the business loses a founder who has passion for the idea, and the founder loses the opportunity to learn how to take a company through scale-up to maturity. And the economy as a whole suffers a lot from this.

    No less an entrepreneur than Andy Gove (one of the founders of Intel) spoke to this in this article about a year ago. http://www.denverpost.com/business/c...041?source=rss Fascinating (and a little disturbing) reading.
    David Fuller
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