Thread: Low-cost monitoring

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  1. #11  
    Senior Member John Saunders's Avatar
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    Yeah, what I would wonder about is if the DVI is sending a computer resolution out or a HDTV signal out. Because some DVI computer monitors don't accept HDTV signals.
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  2. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Saunders View Post
    Forgot about the raid card which would use all 4 spaces...
    Two Quadro 4000, Decklink 3D+, HBA and BMD HDMI bracket works fine. Yes that's five bracket spaces.

    The Quadro 4000 is a single slot card, so you can put the HDMI bracket in the "extra" space that is for the double width GPU cards.

    I also thought that the HDMI out was 8 bit with resolve (maybe they fixed that with V8?) and if so that's another reason to use an HDlink.
    I didn't think that 8 bit HDMI was a Resolve limit, but rather a card limit. I thought they fixed that with the Decklink Extreme 3D+ (as opposed to the non + version.)

    Well, now I have to re-test HDMI out. I'd love for someone from BMD to chime in on this.

    In any case HDMI 1.4 is supposed to work up to 16 bits per channel and up to 4K, though I know no implementation that supports either.

    When shopping for consumer plasma panels for professional use take some care.

    There are 14 bit plasma panels, and they are fairly common, though often their inputs/processors are limited to 10, or even 8 bits! I got bitten by one, I have a 50" Samsung cheapy that has a fantastic 14 bit panel with 8 bit electronics. Next time I buy (for 3D) I'll be taking a computer shopping with me to drive the panels with a 10+ bit output. (Resolve Lite on a Thunderbolt Ultrastudio 3D and MacBook Pro should do fine.)
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member John Saunders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alexander Ibrahim View Post
    Two Quadro 4000, Decklink 3D+, HBA and BMD HDMI bracket works fine. Yes that's five bracket spaces.

    The Quadro 4000 is a single slot card, so you can put the HDMI bracket in the "extra" space that is for the double width GPU cards.
    Good point, will the cables go "around" another card? If not you might have to do something custom. Also the manual says that the GTX285 and the GT120 are the "optimal" cards, so is there any advantage going with 4000s other than only using 2 actual spaces?

    Before we got the HD link we notched our estata raid card for the HDMI cables to go through so that we wouldn't have to cut a hole in the case.

    I know that the Decklink outputs 10bit but for some reason I thought I read that Resolve limited it. I could be totally wrong though.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member John Saunders's Avatar
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    Oh and how would you test if the HDMI is outputting 8 or 10bit?
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  5. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Saunders View Post
    Good point, will the cables go "around" another card? If not you might have to do something custom.
    On my Decklink 3D+ the cables easily go around. My machine has just the Apple default ATI 5770, but when planning I tried running the cables around that card and its fine.

    Also the manual says that the GTX285 and the GT120 are the "optimal" cards, so is there any advantage going with 4000s other than only using 2 actual spaces?
    You may have an older version of the manual. Also, the manual is written for dedicated Resolve performance ... it doesn't pay much mind to the notion that you may need to run Resolve and then flip over to say Premiere or Media Encoder, which I do several times a day.

    The GTX285 is arguably faster than the Quadro 4000, but they are very close. The GT120 though is dog slow by todays standards.

    So, for Resolve performance ... you just need to drive a GUI, the GT120 is just fine for that. You could build a dedicated Resolve system around a GT120/GTX285 or a GT120/Quadro 4000 combination with great results.

    For general use though, the GT120 sucks balls. That's the technical term I believe.

    Anyway, I'd very much rather have the Quadro 4000 in the system.

    Now, for me two Quadro 4000 cards is practically ideal because they use less power than the GTX285 and less space, plus they are quieter. (I have to do audio as well as picture.)

    For absolute top Resolve performance with good general performance with 2 GPU cards a GTX285/Quadro 4000 is the best choice.

    Now ... if you follow the Hackintosh stuff, you can use some PC cards in OS X now, including some very fast cards. Lion supposedly has built in support for other Nvidia cards. I'm hoping to experiment with one of these, some of which are single slot like the Quadro 4000, for use as a Resolve card, and use a real "Mac version" Quadro 4000 for the GUI to drive all my other applications.


    I know that the Decklink outputs 10bit but for some reason I thought I read that Resolve limited it. I could be totally wrong though.
    Or you could be totally right ... now I'm unsure.

    Oh and how would you test if the HDMI is outputting 8 or 10bit?
    Make an image that contains a color ramp that is smooth in 10 bit ... it will show banding in 8 bit. I'd do 4 ramps: one ramp for R, G, B and grayscale. This is trivial to create in After Effects or Motion and then export as ProRes4444 for testing. (You can also create these in Color & FCP. I wouldn't be surprised to be able to create them in Resolve and Premiere, but I don't know how yet.)

    You can also verify this in your application with the full field waveform. The ramp will be a smooth line in the WFM, if you see banding in the image displayed with a smooth WFM, your output is being decimated.

    There are better tests, you can create a set of bars with known 10 bit color values. say 16 bars. Pick them so 8 of the bars are the best 8 bit approximation of their 10 bit neighbors. The difference will be readily apparent.

    Also, in natural footage skies will often show limits.

    Right now I am working a DVCPRO HD project, so its 8 bit source footage anyway. Its funny to see banded source footage suddenly become smooth as you CC it in float space. Next project looks like it will be DSLR ... so more of the same. After that I hope to have some Red or Alexa footage in here again.
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  6. #16  
    for low-cost high-quality calibrated montoring i would recommend the eizo CG245 with a hdlinkpro 3D displayport. The CG245 has displayport and is 10bit over displayport. Also the CG245 support 23,98/24/50 hz also -- you must disable edid in the hdlink pro preferences over the usb port and enable wide frequency for 24-25Hz in the Eizo - hidden menu , see chapter 3.6 of the manual . The display supports native REC709 and EBU.
    ps. a hdmi to displayport won't work, you need the hdlink pro.
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member Adam Jeal's Avatar
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    Hi Filip,

    What about the Eizo CE240W? can you use this with an HDLink Pro?

    EDIT: I've just looked at the CG245W. It looks nice! apparently it supports DCI color spec as well - I'm thinking that this may be an option with a HDLink Pro 3D displayport.

    Update found this on another thread http://reduser.net/forum/showthread....l=1#post779575;

    We looked at the Eizo's but until the very recent new CG245, the CG-range did also not natively support 50-48hz signals. The new CG245 has a 'secret' startup to enable those frequencies on the displayport connector !- activate range to wide with use speciale menu- see chapter 3.6 of the usersmanual. Also use the hdlink pro displayport with the latest firmware 3.5 and use a usb cable on the hdlink pro to enable in the HDLink Utility preferences the override EDID settings. This combination gives native 50hz and 48hz images on the CG245, which is a natively 10bit panel, and has build-in video color profiles for EBU, REC709, etc. There is even a DCP profile, but then the display expects an xyz signal, so the rgb of the hdlink pro give a 'green' image. You can solve this by making your own DCP profile that you can upload into the monitor with the free eizo software and the build-in calibration probe

    Seems like it may be just what I need!


    Adam
    Last edited by Adam Jeal; 08-25-2011 at 03:33 PM.
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