Thread: Best settings for stock footage from raw footage

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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelP View Post
    It would be nice to just purchase and download the R3D file itself.

    Michael
    Hi Michael,

    we believe that R3D becomes more and more a post pro standard. That's why we offer the direct download of the R3D RAW files (incl. RMD) in our RED footage library.

    Cheers

    Thomas.
    FOOTAGE ONLINE - resource for UHD, HD and RED stock footage - on facebook
    www.departmentstudios.de
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  2. #22  
    Senior Member MichaelP's Avatar
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    Excellent!
    ‎"There are a thousand ways to point a camera, but really only one."
    Ernst Lubitsch
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  3. #23  
    Senior Member Antony M's Avatar
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    This is a very interesting thread.
    I have been selling my still photos online for many years, but I'm just starting to consider selling video.

    Which library would people suggest?
    I see Getty gets several mentions, but is it the best one?
    Or is it worth signing up with a library specialising in Red footage?
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  4. #24  
    Moderator David Battistella's Avatar
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    Hi all,

    I advise you all to take a look at youtube.com

    It's the future of footage.

    Why?

    -They pay MUCH higher rates.
    -You upload ONE file, the original R3D and then they take care of the rest of the client delivery.
    -The sliding scale credits system lets clients by any resolution they need up to the R3D and they pay according to their needs.
    -The backend technology is unique.
    -They actually do care about the people getting the images.
    -The site is wicked fast.
    -A very smart and transparent approach to footage sales.
    Some REDUSERS (people you know and some you don't) are already onboard and there will be a limited window in 2012 to get involved.


    PM me for more details.

    David
    "Well, isn't that just amazing!"
    Battistella

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  5. #25  
    Senior Member Johnny Friday's Avatar
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    If you are going to offer Stock Footage. I usually start with some basics with what I shoot...and talk to my footage house that sells for me.
    *First: ask yourself where your footage is ultimately going to end up ? Feature or TV ?
    (usually don't see many feature films searching for stock footage). In my case 99.9% of what i sell goes to TV broadcast.
    *So based on where you think most your footage will end up should tell you what settings to shoot. TV USA: 30fps; Feature: 24fps etc....
    *Then, i'd echo what we keep hearing...i can only speak for myself...people buy what looks good not what looks flat and is ready for coloring. Most TV productions i see have limited budgets and want a finished product that looks good and they just buy the clip that can fit into their edit.

    **R3D--i'll disagree with some here. R3D for most folks i know and sell to is just not an option and they usually don't even know what to do with it or it's a pain to deal with. They want what they work with. i'll bet that's a majority that go with Prores 422 or 4444. I like to offer up Prores 4444....it's the best Prores quality you can go with and if the production DOES do coloring later, they have the best bit depth within Prores 4444 to work with.

    **I look forward to the day i can deliver R3d files, but most editors or producers rather see a flat, neutral image and say "well, nice shot, but doesn't pop or have much color" So, i've found my clips that look good the way i want them to look sell the best. And don't think now that you have a RED you'll be selling 24fps stock.....think about where your footage will likely end up.

    Invest in good monitor and learn the basics of color parameters--i knew nothing a few years ago, but now can deliver a broadcast ready clip that does not break broadcast standards with black/white balances--everything you need is in FCP and Premier Pro as two basic software examples....learn those simple tools: scopes and meters.
    John Friday
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  6. #26  
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    Just getting started with RCX. Please tell me where I can find the de-Bayering controls -- I've looked all over the control screen.

    Thank you,
    Rob
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  7. #27  
    Moderator David Battistella's Avatar
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    Everyone should read this great advice from Johnny. He is bang on. But I think the demand for R3D will increase as the format becomes the standard (not next year, but soon).

    David



    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Friday View Post
    If you are going to offer Stock Footage. I usually start with some basics with what I shoot...and talk to my footage house that sells for me.
    *First: ask yourself where your footage is ultimately going to end up ? Feature or TV ?
    (usually don't see many feature films searching for stock footage). In my case 99.9% of what i sell goes to TV broadcast.
    *So based on where you think most your footage will end up should tell you what settings to shoot. TV USA: 30fps; Feature: 24fps etc....
    *Then, i'd echo what we keep hearing...i can only speak for myself...people buy what looks good not what looks flat and is ready for coloring. Most TV productions i see have limited budgets and want a finished product that looks good and they just buy the clip that can fit into their edit.

    **R3D--i'll disagree with some here. R3D for most folks i know and sell to is just not an option and they usually don't even know what to do with it or it's a pain to deal with. They want what they work with. i'll bet that's a majority that go with Prores 422 or 4444. I like to offer up Prores 4444....it's the best Prores quality you can go with and if the production DOES do coloring later, they have the best bit depth within Prores 4444 to work with.

    **I look forward to the day i can deliver R3d files, but most editors or producers rather see a flat, neutral image and say "well, nice shot, but doesn't pop or have much color" So, i've found my clips that look good the way i want them to look sell the best. And don't think now that you have a RED you'll be selling 24fps stock.....think about where your footage will likely end up.

    Invest in good monitor and learn the basics of color parameters--i knew nothing a few years ago, but now can deliver a broadcast ready clip that does not break broadcast standards with black/white balances--everything you need is in FCP and Premier Pro as two basic software examples....learn those simple tools: scopes and meters.
    "Well, isn't that just amazing!"
    Battistella

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  8. #28  
    Junior Member amber smith's Avatar
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    We only use Prores 422 or 4 by 4. because the stock footage will have to be graded to match the project, you don't want to clip the blacks or drastically alter the flat pass. We would love flat pass stock footage. There's more options and ability to fit it into a project, instead of some dramatic sexy LUT put over it that ruins some of it's range.
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