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  1. #1 Is 11 1/3rd stops enough... 
    ...To avoid clipping in high contrast lighting situations? will highlights rolloff smoothly?

    And to avoid any trace of that ugly video look, particularly in skintones. Or is it a matter of "careful" lighting to avoid this?
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member Jaime Vallés's Avatar
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    If RED delivers anything less than 18 stops, I want my money back! ;)

    I have a feeling that careful lighting with this camera will make some of the most amazing imagery ever captured. But that's just a hunch.
    Jaime Vallés

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  #3  
    The big issue with 11.3 stops is that you've got to make it look nice. Most displays don't have enough dynamic range to show a wide dynamic range, be it from RED or a DSLR or film or whatever. You've got to map that range down to a usable level and that isn't too easy. If you don't do it, the image looks bland and un-dynamic.

    Graeme
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  4. #4  
    REDuser Sponsor Brook Willard's Avatar
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    If you can light for film, you can light for RED.

    As long as you watch your highlights, I suppose.

    Seems valid enough...
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  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brook Willard View Post
    If you can light for film, you can light for RED.

    As long as you watch your highlights, I suppose.

    Seems valid enough...
    ...but will you have to watch your highlights any more or less than with film...?

    I watched Catch 22 recently, and there's a scene in a dimly lit room, where a bare lightbulb is switched on - and the exposure is COMPLETELY blasted out, overexposed like crazy - but it doesn't clip - it's still a smooth transition. Looks really really nice. Sort of... milky, for want of a better word...

    It mentions in the tech specs the ability to work in 10 bit log space - I presume this would make things better for highlight detail preservation? and pose more of a challenge in getting it to display nicely - that's what you are talking about, right Graeme?
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  6. #6  
    REDuser Sponsor Brook Willard's Avatar
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    REDCODE = 12-bit. [edit: missed the "log" part of that post]

    As for whether we'll have to watch highlights any differently... I suppose time will tell.
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  #7  
    10bit log doesn't give you any "anti-clip" advantage. It's just a way of compressing 4096 values (native 12bit) to 1024 values (10 bit) biassing the losses so that most of them occur on very bright values that have more information, and less losses occur on the dark and mid range values.

    Under normal conditions, you'll do as top DSLR shooters do and "ETTR" Expose To The Right: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...se-right.shtml

    Graeme
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  8. #8  
    Senior Member Matthew Greene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruairi Robinson View Post
    ...but will you have to watch your highlights any more or less than with film...?
    Yeah, just as you would with reversal film or any "positive" medium. With negatives you gotta watch your shadows. It's not really a disadvantage, just a reversed methodology.
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  9. #9  
    REDuser Sponsor Brook Willard's Avatar
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    I've been wondering how ETTR will effect high contrast [read: very bright highlights] images. That extra ~half stop could spell disaster on certain images.

    Obviously it's all up to the operator. I almost always ETTR with my SLR but I can't remember doing so in a very bright situation.
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  #10  
    If the situation is over bright by many stops, you've got to decide which highlights in the scene to ETTR to, and protect them, and let the super-brights just blow out. If you don't, you may find that the shadows are too dark and too noisy to be rescued to make a nice image. As with all rules, ETTR must be used with a dose of common sense.

    Graeme
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