Thread: Canon L series Glass

Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1 Canon L series Glass 
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dublin , Ireland
    Posts
    9
    Shooting my Graduation piece for Film School.

    Renting RED and Canon L Series glass -24-70 f2.8, a 70-200 f4, and a 16-20 f2.8 Tokina lens.

    Any thoughts on the Lenses - strengths/ weaknesses ?

    I'm directing Not a DP - just need to get my head around any implications of using said lenses.


    Thanks.
    Niall
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    I do not own any of these lenses, but I do have a number of L-series primes and a couple of zooms.

    If you are using the Birger mount, and all is working perfectly, you'll have no issues at all when using the zooms as variable primes, except, of course, that there will be breathing of various amounts with these lenses, some worse than others. You will also NOT be able to zoom in or out while holding focus. Still lenses just don't allow that capability.

    We love the look of both Nikon and Canon glass, but there are some compromises involved, and those really deal with the ability to zoom in focus and with breathing while pulling focus. In some cases, the breathing can actually be quite beneficial, however, as the subtle magnification changes can enhance the pulls.

    Your lenses are pretty slow by Canon standards, however, so make certain you have plenty of light.

    Stephen
    Scarlet Dragon with Canon, Sigma, and Tokina lenses and the Optitron 2 wireless focus system
    First feature film, Works in Progress, out on DVD (Vanguard Cinema) and online.
    Second feature film, the miniseries Terminal, currently available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07R8RQ488
    Third feature film, The Tree, currently available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07JJ179RP
    Fourth feature film, The Land, currently under review at film festivals around the world.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,962
    Quote Originally Posted by Niall Maher View Post
    Shooting my Graduation piece for Film School.

    Renting RED and Canon L Series glass -[FONT=Verdana, Helvetica, Arial]24-70 f2.8, a 70-200 f4, and a 16-20 f2.8 Tokina lens.

    Any thoughts on the Lenses - strengths/ weaknesses ?

    I'm directing Not a DP - just need to get my head around any implications of using said lenses.
    Those are bit slow if you're going to be in low light. Every lens has it's own characteristics but most tend to look good on RED. I shoot mostly Canon's, but I don't have any of those. Don't be worried about image quality. Check to verify focus is smooth and you have enough light. Shoot a test ahead of time. Also, focus may or may not hold focus through a zoom. backfocus needs to be perfect and the lens has to be capable of it. In short, don't plan on zooming during a shot.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Manchester, UK.
    Posts
    17
    I don't know what availablility is like where you are, but if you are paying to rent these lenses, I would be tempted to shop around and try and get a set of Red Pro Primes / Zeiss Standards etc.

    Neil.
    Neil Harrison
    DP / VFX / Photographer
    Manchester UK
    ----------------------
    www.red-frog.co.uk
    ----------------------
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Senior Member Liam Hall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    London/Worldwide
    Posts
    1,493
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Pruitt View Post
    You will also NOT be able to zoom in or out while holding focus. Still lenses just don't allow that capability.
    You can if you are using parfocal lenses. Both those Canon's are parfocal and both are very good lenses indeed. The 70-200 is sharp, but a little slow - if you can get the 70-200 f/2.8 you'll be in better shape. Can't speak for the tokina 16-20 as I've not come across that one, but the tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 is very good if you can get hold of one.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Red Savant Steve Gibby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Southern Utah and worldwide
    Posts
    3,757
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Pruitt View Post
    You will also NOT be able to zoom in or out while holding focus. Still lenses just don't allow that capability.
    Hmm...that's true of many still zooms, but I disagree somewhat on your conclusion. To categorically state that no still zooms hold focus through a zoom is inaccurate. There are multiple still zooms I own and regularly use on Red which hold focus well throughout a zoom. On my Red cameras I use 22 different Nikon zoom and prime lenses, and a Tokina 11-16 f2.8 in Nikon mount. I also use one Canon zoom on Red.

    My Canon FD 150-600 f5.6L zoom, which is stock except for a Century PL mount conversion, holds focus very well throughout a zoom. This stock lens is zoomed by a manual push/pull knob on the lower left side of the control case below the lens barrel. The same knob is also twisted to rack focus. With practice the push/pull/twist action is smooth and accurate. Focus is dead-on throughout a zoom.

    Some examples of my Nikon zooms which hold focus throughout a zoom are my 50-300 f4.5 AIS and 80-200 f2.8 AF. The AF version is zoomed and focused by pushing/pulling/twisting the lens barrel housing. The 50-300 is zoomed by twisting a dedicated zoom ring. Both these lenses hold focus very well throughout the full range of a zoom.

    My DSLR system is a Canon 5D, with a range of Canon L series lenses. Of the lenses Niall listed, I own the 24-70 f2.8L. It is a very crisp lens, with nice contrast. I also own the 70-200 f2.8L lens that Liam mentioned (mine is the IS version). Its an excellent lens. The three zooms I use the most on my 5D are the 16-35 f2.8 MKII, 24-70 f2.8L, and the 70-200 f2.8L IS. Each of those is an excellent lens. Except for the PL converted 150-600 I don't use my Canon lenses on Red though, because I don't use a Birger mount on my Red cameras. My cameras have Nikon and PL mounts.

    All of the above said, I generally use my still zooms on Red as variable primes, even with the ones that hold focus through a zoom. I'm not a big fan of zooming during a shot unless I absolutely have to. Because I work in a lot of fast-moving and dangerous genres where zooms are a better choice than primes, I usually use my zooms to quickly re-frame each shot then hit record - as variable primes. The exception to that is when I'm tracking sports action or wildlife in motion. That's why I selected the Canon 150-600, Nikon 50-300 AIS, and Nikon 80-200 AF for use on sports and wildlife - because they are optically quite good, but each of them holds focus throughout a zoom - something thats critical when shooting high-motion tracking shots of sports and wildlife.

    Each still lens model has its nuances, and even within a model there can be variances in performance. Before I buy a still lens, I read all the reviews on it I can find. After getting the lens I test it out in the genres I shoot. If it performs well, I put it into my kits. If not, I return it and get another one of the same lens. There can be individual lemons within each lens model.

    Optically most top-level still lenses perform quite well on Red One. The obvious workarounds are in mechanics and accessories. Because I do very mobile work, I never use matte boxes or follow focus units with my still lenses on Red. All filtering is via screw-on filters, and all focusing is by eye, by racking the lens itself. I don't do narrative (by choice), but I do about every other genre there is.

    Niall: In experienced hands, using well-selected lenses, and observing the necessary workarounds involved, many still lenses are an optically excellent, cost-effective option for use on Red One. I've used them extensively and almost exclusively on Red One for 2.5 years now, with great results.
    Executive Producer, Director, DP, Cinematographer
    Red pioneer: RED One 0008, Red One "London", Red One "Hollywood", Epic M 0008, Epic X (2)
    Golden Gate 3D - www.gg3d.com

    Co-Producer, IMAX film CUBA - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ijvjeZ89qY
    Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/stevegibby/
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    ashland, oregon
    Posts
    2,588
    I agree with Steve about some still camera zooms holding focus when zoomed. The better made (mechanics) ones such as the Canon L series the Leicas and some of the Zeiss made lenses for Contax and the newer Nikon mount ones are quite good. What does vari with these lenses is their consitency from one example to another. Although the variances is less then on cheaper lenses.


    CHUCK
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,736
    Quote Originally Posted by Liam Hall View Post
    You can if you are using parfocal lenses. Both those Canon's are parfocal and both are very good lenses indeed. The 70-200 is sharp, but a little slow - if you can get the 70-200 f/2.8 you'll be in better shape. Can't speak for the tokina 16-20 as I've not come across that one, but the tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 is very good if you can get hold of one.
    I second the 70-200 f2.8, especially as it'll match the max aperture of the other two, and if you can get the Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 too you'll be happy when you're shooting in those small rooms and can still get a wide shot!
    DOP / Digital Lighting Camera Operator
    London, UK.

    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Niall Maher View Post
    and a 16-20 f2.8 Tokina lens.
    Never heard of a Tokina 16-20mm... Are you sure you don't mean the 11-16mm?
    Nils J. Nesse

    Epic-W Helium 8K in Bergen, Norway
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #10  
    Question on the zooms. I stand corrected on the non-inability of some Canon lenses to do a properly-focused zoom. I, personally, have never encountered these lenses, but that's my inexperience, I'm sure.

    Is there that much of a difference between a zoom during the shot and a zoom done during post? I can imagine there might be a touch of resolution loss, but I always try to dolly anyway, so I'm just not sure how that would work.

    Thanks.

    Stephen
    Scarlet Dragon with Canon, Sigma, and Tokina lenses and the Optitron 2 wireless focus system
    First feature film, Works in Progress, out on DVD (Vanguard Cinema) and online.
    Second feature film, the miniseries Terminal, currently available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07R8RQ488
    Third feature film, The Tree, currently available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07JJ179RP
    Fourth feature film, The Land, currently under review at film festivals around the world.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Tags for this Thread

View Tag Cloud

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts