Thread: Nikkor lenses I own/plan to buy + multiplication factor for RED

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  1. #1 Nikkor lenses I own/plan to buy + multiplication factor for RED 
    I'm a bit confused . . . Now that I've read a couple of Evin's excellent lens reviews, I'm not quite sure about a couple things. Below, in "planning to buy," I just picked the fastest lenses Nikon makes, and chose the manual focus versions over the AF version, whenever possible. Lenses in "planning to buy" are all current-model lenses. Evin's review seemed to suggest, however, that the manual-focus version of a given Nikkor is NOT necessarily preferred over the AF version (in the same focal length/maximum aperture). Am I missing something here?

    Also, I didn't realize there was a focal length multiplication factor involved (duh!), so I erroneously chose my focal lengths based on 35mm still equivalents. What is the multiplication factor for 35mm still lenses for RED?

    Was planning to buy (before I realized the multiplication factor for RED):

    1. Nikkor 24mm f/2.0 AIS manual focus [$599]
    2. Nikkor 35mm f/1.4 AIS manual focus [$699]
    3. Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 AIS manual focus [$529]
    4. Nikkor 55mm f/2.8 micro AIS manual focus [$329]
    5. Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 AF-D [$924]

    Already own:

    A. Nikkor 14mm f/2.8 AF-ED
    B. Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 AF-D
    C. Nikkor 24mm f/2.8 AF-D
    D. Nikkor 35mm f/2.0 AF-D
    E. Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 AF-D
    F. Nikkor 60mm micro f/2.8 AF-D
    G. Nikkor 85mm f/1.8 AF-D
    H. Nikkor 180mm f/2.8 AF-ED
    I. Nikkor 18mm-70mm f/3.5-4.5 AF-S [G]
    J. Nikkor 70-200 f/2.8 AF-ED
    K. Nikkor 70-300 f/4.0-5.6 AF-ED [non-G]

    Thanks in advance, for any comments or suggestions.
    .
    ralph oshiro
    RED411.NET
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  2. #2  
    One more sorta lens-related question . . .

    So, you see I'll be using primes a lot. So I'll be changing lenses A LOT. Is the sensor sealed somehow? At least, is there an IR filter (I understand there's no internal ND filter wheel or anything) or protective something in front of the sensor, or is it completely exposed when I pull a lens off of its mount like a DSLR?
    .
    ralph oshiro
    RED411.NET
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  3. #3 More info...and count the RED ONE crop factors with 35mm Nikkors... 
    Senior Member Sanjin Jukic's Avatar
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    RED S35mm>>24.4 x 13.7

    RED 35mm>>22.2 x 12.6
    http://red.com/formatoptions.htm

    35 mm film (still photography)

    135 (ISO 1007) is a film format for still photography.The film is 35 mm wide. Each image is 36x24 mm.



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/135_film

    35 mm film and Super 35 (movie formats)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/35_mm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_35_mm_film






    Digital photography
    Sensor size and angle of view



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital..._angle_of_view
    "There is no point in having sharp images when you've fuzzy ideas."
    Jean-Luc Godard.

    Dynamic range is, after all, the measurement between well saturation (photosite blowout) and noise floor.
    Thom Hogan
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  4. #4  
    Thanks for digging up all that resource material! So, the multiplication factor (is there another thread that already explains all of this?) would be roughly x1.5 in S35? Given:

    RED S35mm: 24.4 x 13.7
    RED 35mm: 22.2 x 12.6
    135 (ISO 1007): 36 x 24

    So, using only the horizontal dimension, it would be roughly:

    36/24 = x1.5 multiplication factor for S35mm-size acquisition
    36/22.2 = x1.62 multiplication factor for 35mm-size acquisition

    Not that my math is accurate, or did this correctly, but is that factor about right? Clearly, there's a LOT about RED that I didn't know, that I didn't know. Also, doesn't this mean that I will have different multiplication factors, based on what frame size/resolution I'm acquiring in?
    .
    ralph oshiro
    RED411.NET
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  5. #5  
    That's about right, and you are correct the MF is not necessarily better than the AF equivelent but in most cases they are equal. One lens I would suggest adding to your list is the 17-35mm 2.8 AF Nikkor. Your 18-70 and 70-200 will not allow you aperture control.
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  6. #6  
    Thanks Evin! The 18-70 is the only 'G' lens I own. The 70-200 f/2.8 is a regular, non-'G' Nikkor, (it's just the non-VR version)--it should work. Keep up the great work!
    .
    ralph oshiro
    RED411.NET
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member Sanjin Jukic's Avatar
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    Two examples of the crop factor made with a Nikkor AF-S 17-35 mm zoom lens at the same focal length using Nikon D1X (digital) and Nikon F90X (analog).

    "The D1X (and currently all other Nikon DSLR cameras) has a sensor size of 23.7 x 15.5 mm.
    This sensor size is sometimes referred to as APS size.

    As a result the effective field of view is 35/23.7 = 1.5 times smaller."
    http://www.millhouse.nl/digitalcropfactorframe.html


    Nikon D1X

    Nikkor AF-S 17-35

    at 17 mm focal length

    23.7 mm CCD sensor


    Nikon F90X

    Nikkor AF-S 17-35

    at 26 mm focal length

    35 mm slide film

    Factoring in the Digital Crop Factor

    http://www.earthboundlight.com/photo...op-factor.html
    "There is no point in having sharp images when you've fuzzy ideas."
    Jean-Luc Godard.

    Dynamic range is, after all, the measurement between well saturation (photosite blowout) and noise floor.
    Thom Hogan
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  8. #8  
    Senior Member Martin Drew's Avatar
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    Proteus put together this great chart of all the sensor windowing format options over at dvxuser a while back. It has all the multiplication factors etc. worth bookmarking.

    http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/showthread.php?t=64685

    Martin
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member Stephen Williams's Avatar
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    Hi,

    Bear in mind that Zeiss Superspeeds were made from 18mm to 85mm. That range has for many years been enough for many people shooting on 35mm film. Wider & longer do have their uses, just not every day.

    Stephen
    Epic Dragon owner, the first upgraded camera in Switzerland :D
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  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    Proteus put together this great chart of all the sensor windowing format options over at dvxuser a while back. It has all the multiplication factors etc. worth bookmarking.
    Thanks! What a great post! Well, I guess that answers my question . . . so we do have a multiplication factor, and it varies! Thanks again!
    .
    ralph oshiro
    RED411.NET
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