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  1. #1 Sensor (OLPF) Cleaning - What is recommended? 
    Senior Member Ryan E. Walters's Avatar
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    So what is the official word on the proper method of cleaning the sensor (OLPF to be exact) on the Red One?

    After doing a search, I found the following tools (below), but no real answer, or suggestions on the correct way, method, or tool to use. I would appreciate any and all input on this matter as I'm looking to invest in the proper tools for the job.

    Dry Tools-
    https://www.micro-tools.com/store/it...ItemCode=PSI-6
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc....html#features
    http://www.nrdfirefly.com/

    Wet Tools-
    http://www.delkin.com/products/senso...sorsystem.html
    Cheers,
    Ryan E. Walters
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    "Too often people get caught up in the technical end of things ... They are missing the point completely. This way there is no proper input of individual personality." Vittorio Storaro, ASC, AIC.


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    We use the Sensor Swabs and the delkin scope at RED.. but If I remember either Evin or Brook compared a bunch and had a pretty good summary of what they thought was best.

    One thing to note is your first link for the sensor swabs you have the wrong size.. you want the ones made for APS-C size cameras ( type 2 ) , not type 3 for Full Frame sensor cameras.
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member KETCH ROSSi's Avatar
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    I use a combination of cleaning tools, I always start by looking in with the Visible Sensor loupe, to see what I have on the sensor, then I blowing it with the FireFly, to remove dust with out creating static, some times I follow with a regular blower, as it has stronger blow of air, and then return to the use of the FireFly, I do this few times then look again.

    I always try to avoid touching the sensor, and do so only if I just can't seem to be able to blow the dust away, or simply discover that what I have is not dust but dry wet spot, from condensation or any type of dirt that got in during the change of lens.

    In this cases I use the Green Clean sensor cleaner, first the wet foam swab and immediately after the Dry sweeper, very careful and very delicately, trying to stay away form the corners and sides of the sensor not to catch and or remove the oils from it.

    This combination has worked greatly on all of my cameras, they also make the swab for full frame sensors, and I would not use one or the other in the wrong size sensor to avoid again to touch spots that you re not supposed to, like the corners and extreme sides of the sensor.

    ciao
    KETCH ROSSi F i l m m a k e r
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Ryan E. Walters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarred Land View Post
    We use the Sensor Swabs and the delkin scope at RED.. but If I remember either Evin or Brook compared a bunch and had a pretty good summary of what they thought was best.

    One thing to note is your first link for the sensor swabs you have the wrong size.. you want the ones made for APS-C size cameras ( type 2 ) , not type 3 for Full Frame sensor cameras.
    Thanks for the correction. :)

    I also appreciate the info. I'll do a search under Evin or Brook to see if I can find that post- it did not come up when I searched for it the first time.
    Cheers,
    Ryan E. Walters
    Cinematographer
    www.ryanewalters.com - Tutorials - IMDB - Twitter - REEL
    Specializing in Digital Cinematography

    "Too often people get caught up in the technical end of things ... They are missing the point completely. This way there is no proper input of individual personality." Vittorio Storaro, ASC, AIC.


    Whirlpool GC5SHAXVS / WFW9400SZ / GFE471LVS / GU3600XTVY / GH7208XRS / WFW9400SZ / WED9750WW / GLS3665RS / and on back order, but expected in soon MTKS-230-C
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Ryan E. Walters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KETCH ROSSI View Post
    I use a combination of cleaning tools, I always start by looking in with the Visible Sensor loupe, to see what I have on the sensor, then I blowing it with the FireFly, to remove dust with out creating static, some times I follow with a regular blower, as it has stronger blow of air, and then return to the use of the FireFly, I do this few times then look again.

    I always try to avoid touching the sensor, and do so only if I just can't seem to be able to blow the dust away, or simply discover that what I have is not dust but dry wet spot, from condensation or any type of dirt that got in during the change of lens.

    In this cases I use the Green Clean sensor cleaner, first the wet foam swab and immediately after the Dry sweeper, very careful and very delicately, trying to stay away form the corners and sides of the sensor not to catch and or remove the oils from it.

    This combination has worked greatly on all of my cameras, they also make the swab for full frame sensors, and I would not use one or the other in the wrong size sensor to avoid again to touch spots that you re not supposed to, like the corners and extreme sides of the sensor.

    ciao
    Thanks for that detailed response. Are these the Green Clean cleaners you are talking about: http://www.green-clean.at/en/camera/...eaning-system/ ?
    Cheers,
    Ryan E. Walters
    Cinematographer
    www.ryanewalters.com - Tutorials - IMDB - Twitter - REEL
    Specializing in Digital Cinematography

    "Too often people get caught up in the technical end of things ... They are missing the point completely. This way there is no proper input of individual personality." Vittorio Storaro, ASC, AIC.


    Whirlpool GC5SHAXVS / WFW9400SZ / GFE471LVS / GU3600XTVY / GH7208XRS / WFW9400SZ / WED9750WW / GLS3665RS / and on back order, but expected in soon MTKS-230-C
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member KETCH ROSSi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan E. Walters View Post
    Thanks for that detailed response. Are these the Green Clean cleaners you are talking about: http://www.green-clean.at/en/camera/...eaning-system/ ?
    Welcome Ryan, yes they are, just make sure to purchase that have the full bottom curve in GREEN, the one with a 15mm stretch.

    Also very important to open the wet foam swab right before you use it, as they dry quickly, same goes for the sue of the Dry sweeper, do so right after you finished with the wet swabs, as not to let any dirt, get dry again on the sensor.

    ciao
    KETCH ROSSi F i l m m a k e r
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    RED EPIC #00008 aka DragonM8
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  7. #7  
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    I've used the "Lenspen Sensor Klear" made by Optex on my DSLR- It has worked perfectly well so far. It's a simple dry pad cleaning method, the pen lasts for years.
    Perhaps there are unique circumstances, but consider this as a very decent and easy to use remedy for particle removal. It costs about 25$ and should be available in most drug mart type camera departments as well as pro shops.
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  8. #8  
    Senior Member Shawn Nelson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KETCH ROSSI View Post
    I use a combination of cleaning tools, I always start by looking in with the Visible Sensor loupe, to see what I have on the sensor, then I blowing it with the FireFly, to remove dust with out creating static, some times I follow with a regular blower, as it has stronger blow of air, and then return to the use of the FireFly, I do this few times then look again.

    I always try to avoid touching the sensor, and do so only if I just can't seem to be able to blow the dust away, or simply discover that what I have is not dust but dry wet spot, from condensation or any type of dirt that got in during the change of lens.

    In this cases I use the Green Clean sensor cleaner, first the wet foam swab and immediately after the Dry sweeper, very careful and very delicately, trying to stay away form the corners and sides of the sensor not to catch and or remove the oils from it.

    This combination has worked greatly on all of my cameras, they also make the swab for full frame sensors, and I would not use one or the other in the wrong size sensor to avoid again to touch spots that you re not supposed to, like the corners and extreme sides of the sensor.

    ciao
    Except you arent touching the sensor, that's just the olpf, a piece of glass right? The sensor is safely behind that
    "Only those who attempt the absurd will achieve the impossible." -MC Escher
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member KETCH ROSSi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Nelson View Post
    Except you arent touching the sensor, that's just the olpf, a piece of glass right? The sensor is safely behind that
    We say sensor cleaning out of general understanding, as not every one really knows the complexity of a design in the Sensor and OLPF stacking, for the construction of the sensor module.

    BUt yes I do refer ( Underlined) for those that know to the OLPF, as we can't reach the Sensor directly, but it is just the same a very delicate layer of softened Glass, which in some cases, it shows a jelly effect when cleaning it, if a light pressure is applied, not suggested!

    Below I attached few pics, one shows the OLPF it self in carious shapes for different applications, and the other is a diagram from a Nikon sensor system, to show case their cleaning technology, here we can clearly see the elements that make up for this particular system were the sensor is firmly attached to the mechanical and electronic element, in the very center of the five components of this system is the OLPF.

    ciao
    KETCH ROSSi F i l m m a k e r
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    RED EPIC #00008 aka DragonM8
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  10.   This is the last RED TEAM post in this thread.   #10  
    correct.. and even without the OLPF filter it would be impossible to touch the actual sensor.. as there is an additional protective glass bonded to the ceramic frame of the sensor itself.
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