Thread: Switching lenses with camera on?

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  1. #1 Switching lenses with camera on? 
    Hey, still getting use to my first Red camera. Normally my DSLR's I would power down and switch lenses since it only takes a few seconds to power them up. But the Komodo takes some time to boot up so I thought I would check first if it is OK? Thanks.
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  2. #2  
    It's totally acceptable to swap lenses with the camera running. In fact, the quicker the better or you'll have a very upset AD breathing down your neck!
    Carlino // duncanobryan.com
    Epic-W #004102 / Komodo #002607
    Moviecam Compact 3-perf
    Arriflex 35-III 3-perf
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  3. #3  
    Good to know, thank you. Wasn't sure if it would harm the sensor or not.
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  4. #4  
    No problem! Just be careful as you're swapping and don't let anything but the lens in there! But that applies to any camera.
    Carlino // duncanobryan.com
    Epic-W #004102 / Komodo #002607
    Moviecam Compact 3-perf
    Arriflex 35-III 3-perf
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Christoffer Glans's Avatar
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    No problem, this is standard on cinema cameras, there's no point it off.
    "Using any digital cinema camera today is like sending your 35mm rolls to a standard lab. -Using a Red is like owning a dark room."
    Red Weapon 6K #00600 Red Komodo #002397
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member Karim D. Ghantous's Avatar
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    I assume that there is no risk of getting dust on the sensor?
    Good production values may not be noticed. Bad production values will be.
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member Christoffer Glans's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karim D. Ghantous View Post
    I assume that there is no risk of getting dust on the sensor?
    Why would the risk be more or less based on if the camera is on or not? Look at pro photographers who swap lenses all the time, fast and pretty roughly when hunting those perfect moments.

    Problems with sensors rarely come from dust and physical stuff but most often from bad electronics, dead pixels and other stuff internally. I've rarely seen a sensor break down by anything else than bad manufacturing.
    "Using any digital cinema camera today is like sending your 35mm rolls to a standard lab. -Using a Red is like owning a dark room."
    Red Weapon 6K #00600 Red Komodo #002397
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  8. #8  
    I also have on Pre Order the drop in filter from https://breakthrough.photography/ This will offer a level of protection too, when it arrives. Thanks!
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  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Christoffer Glans View Post
    Why would the risk be more or less based on if the camera is on or not? Look at pro photographers who swap lenses all the time, fast and pretty roughly when hunting those perfect moments.

    Problems with sensors rarely come from dust and physical stuff but most often from bad electronics, dead pixels and other stuff internally. I've rarely seen a sensor break down by anything else than bad manufacturing.
    Because when the camera(sensor) is on, there is basically a static charge across the sensor and particles, dust, etc. are attracted to it and land on the OLPF. It may have been the original C500 or PL mount C300 that had a button that basically shut down the sensor so you could change lenses without shutting the entire camera down.

    And I would never take operating technique from a still photog and carry it over to motion. Iíve spent my entire career shooting next to still photogs in the sports world. Half of their time spent in post is cloning out spots of dirt from their filthy lenses and sensors. One of my friends(still photog) was giving me crap one day telling me I had the cleanest lens he had ever seen. Which isnít really a major accomplishment when compared to how they treat their lenses.
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  10. #10  
    Senior Member Karim D. Ghantous's Avatar
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    Good points there, Christopher. It's also worth pointing out that some cameras have an anti-dust feature.
    Good production values may not be noticed. Bad production values will be.
    Unsplash | Pinterest | Flickr | Instagram | 1961 (blog)
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