Thread: best TV for watching movies

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  1. #11  
    Senior Member Blair Thornton's Avatar
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  2. #12  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    This is a bit of my wheelhouse and I don't want to get too controversial as there are likely people who feel strongly about one thing or another.

    Industry-wise were are in a moment where theatrically emissive screens have provided perhaps the best viewing experience you can currently have. To that degree I would say especially for those interested in HDR content as you don't suffer from light bleed that occurs on projected mediums or optical related artifacts.

    To some of the other above poster's points, you need to look at your room and general viewing experience. What is the ambient light like and how far you are from the screen?

    The absolute best projected image I've seen in SDR and HDR is the Dolby reference theater we have here in Hollywood. If you're curious they use two 4K projectors to create a slightly higher than 300 nit HDR experience, but that is in a perfectly dark theater. Even that suffers from bleed however, but that's also part of what happens on projection screens.

    Seeing my work on both the Samsung Onyx and Sony CLED screens is more alluring to me personally in a theater setting, but screen size will be key if you want that large screen experience in home. Generally I like 70" televisions as a baseline for a somewhat cinematic experience in the home. And that's what's in my living room, my office has a smaller screen, but I'm also closer to it. Generally for 4K and 8K screens I like something between 55-120+ inches, but it depends on where you are watching the content from.

    In that effort it's all about optimal viewing distance. Over the past two decades I've done R&D in regards to viewing distances with THX, television manufacturers, and more recently Dolby. I've made a tool that helps you plan where best to sit for a given screen and the general range used theatrically as well as a couple of my own algorithms, feel free to give it a whirl:

    http://phfx.com/tools/optimalViewing/

    That's the base tool, but here's an example of an 8K screen at 70 inches:
    http://phfx.com/tools/optimalViewing...Y=&diagonal=70

    On the emissive display side the technology I currently feel produces great images are OLED, QLED, and Mini LED. All have pros and cons really with OLED being more ideal for very dark rooms typically. I'm very much into Mini LED at the moment and one of my grading displays is indeed that, though my reference panels are LCD based.

    For projection, I'd say that gets most interesting if you are going above 120". Plus there's been big advancements in short throw projection in home if you have space related constraints.

    No matter what you invest in I would suggest something that supports at least 4K and HDR. 8K if you want to be a bit more forward thinking or if that interests you. USA has very little 8K content, but there's two streaming entities already overseas that support 8K as well as YouTube internationally. Most productions are 1080p or 2160p at this point with 2160p/UHD 4K being the obvious high growth trend.
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  3. #13  
    LG OLED fully calibrated via the internal or an external 3D LUT.

    Many post houses use them as client screens.

    There will be a calibration app released in the next months that will automate this, we're currently alpha testing it and it's a game changer for us. Probably will not hire outside calibration experts anymore.

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  4. #14  
    Vizio M Series Quantum 2019. It's cheaper but still do surprisingly well!
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  5. #15  
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    Thanks for all the feedback!
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Blair S. Paulsen's Avatar
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    Projection, JVC RS-3000 D-ILA.

    Cheers - #19
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  7. #17  
    Without knowing what size you’re going for or what other equipment you’re looking to fit in budget, it’s hard to give specific guidance. That said, unless you’re looking for the larger sizes of 75” or more, you can buy a lot of TV for $4000. I know many love the LG OLED displays, I don’t... they suffer from over-amped reds and color bleeding. No amount of calibration or adjustment can solve those two issues, even on the latest models. Many of these displays also exhibit motion issues, but that seems to be much better on the latest ones.

    While I don’t care for them, they can look good and are still one of the best options out there. But they really need to be calibrated and set up by someone familiar with doing so.

    IMO, best TVs right now are the Samsung 8K QLED. BUT... you will actually get a better overall TV with the top model 4K QLED vs the low or mid level 8K models and 8K is in a lot of flux right now in terms of standards with no specific content available. The QLEDs have solid motion and don’t suffer from any color bleeding. However they are crazy sharp and it’s easy to see the screen door effect on the 4K units because the pixels are so crisp. The colors are way over saturated in most of the standard modes, but adjust down well and evenly without pro calibration.

    Vizio Quantum series displays are the same tech, but lack the same level of internal processing and adjustments. They’re a great option for more mindful budgets.

    Other standard LED TVs from Sony, Samsung, LG and many others can all still be very good at some very reasonable prices.

    A good projector setup can provide a very cinematic experience. You will spend a lot of money on a good projector. Sony is the only company making a true 4K projector for home or similar installations. Most of the other offerings out there, including the JVC D’ILA and just released Samsungs are all DMD (Texas Instruments DLP tech) using pixel shifting.
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  8. #18  
    Senior Member Blair S. Paulsen's Avatar
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    The JVC D-ILA projectors had been using pixel shifting for years, but the latest models - RS/RX series - are native 4K.

    https://www.projectorcentral.com/JVC...tor-Review.htm

    I had several Sony beamers over the years, but the panel failure on my 600ES was the last straw for me.

    IMHO, projectors reflecting light off of a screen create an experience closer to theatrical than any emissive panel. YMMV.

    Cheers - #19
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  9. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kilgroe View Post
    Without knowing what size you’re going for or what other equipment you’re looking to fit in budget, it’s hard to give specific guidance. That said, unless you’re looking for the larger sizes of 75” or more, you can buy a lot of TV for $4000. I know many love the LG OLED displays, I don’t... they suffer from over-amped reds and color bleeding. No amount of calibration or adjustment can solve those two issues, even on the latest models. Many of these displays also exhibit motion issues, but that seems to be much better on the latest ones.
    We're not seeing that problem in the LG OLED's. We do see problems in near-black and fade-to-black situations where the image gets very blocky and quantized (and that's a 10-bit image in 10-bit mode). The good news is that the current CX series solved that for us. We're only using them for Rec709 -- for HDR/Dolby Vision, you need a true 4K HDR mastering display like the Sony BVM or the FSI XM series.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  10. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kilgroe View Post
    Without knowing what size you’re going for or what other equipment you’re looking to fit in budget, it’s hard to give specific guidance. That said, unless you’re looking for the larger sizes of 75” or more, you can buy a lot of TV for $4000. I know many love the LG OLED displays, I don’t... they suffer from over-amped reds and color bleeding. No amount of calibration or adjustment can solve those two issues, even on the latest models. Many of these displays also exhibit motion issues, but that seems to be much better on the latest ones.
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    We're not seeing that problem in the LG OLED's. We do see problems in near-black and fade-to-black situations where the image gets very blocky and quantized (and that's a 10-bit image in 10-bit mode). The good news is that the current CX series solved that for us. We're only using them for Rec709 -- for HDR/Dolby Vision, you need a true 4K HDR mastering display like the Sony BVM or the FSI XM series.
    I don’t have any issues with color bleed on my (several years old) LG OLED, either.
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