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  1. #1 best TV for watching movies 
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    I have an old Panasonic VIERA TC-P42 that I'm looking to replace (plasma). What's the best TV for watching movies (budget uner $4k)? My parents have a LG oled and I can't get the motion to look good (looks stuccato, 60 fps, etc).
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  2. #2  
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    These people do a lot of testing https://www.flatpanelshd.com/
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  3. #3  
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    The LG OLED's are great, provided you get them calibrated.
    marc wielage, csi • colorist/post consultant • daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Chris McKechnie's Avatar
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    You’d be better off with a projector
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    Senior Member Simon Dunne's Avatar
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    Make sure you get a 10b panel - http://www.displayspecifications.com/
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member Bastian Meier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris McKechnie View Post
    You’d be better off with a projector
    curios what projector you would recommend at the moment
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  7. #7  
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    My first choice would be an LG OLED, but dialing in the optimum settings is a complex process. The menus are extensive and access to some with their magic remote seems to depend on what the source material is. You can't access the HDR adjustments unless you are viewing an HDR source.
    I have new this year LG LED HDR model and it took a few days to get the HDR settings dialed in in Expert mode to produce consistent results. The motion issue can be addressed in settings too, but it may take some experimentation to determine what you like the best.
    None of this is covered very well in the user manual. In Expert mode they have an internal guided setup that helps dial in basic calibration using a series of monochrome shaded patterns that you match for value.
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  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Fiske View Post
    I have an old Panasonic VIERA TC-P42 that I'm looking to replace (plasma). What's the best TV for watching movies (budget uner $4k)? My parents have a LG oled and I can't get the motion to look good (looks stuccato, 60 fps, etc).
    Have you checked the settings? Pretty much ALL TV’s have some type of “motion smoothing/interpolation/120hz, etc.” option that is usually on by default. And if other equipment is hooked-up, like AVR’s that do resolution processing, etc., it can all interact and you can get strange results. I have a 4K HDR LG OLED In the bedroom and I didn’t realize that a certain setting was on in the AVR and I was getting very strange motion from certain channels/resolutions, until I figured it out. But one thing is certain, always make sure the “motion smoothing” is zero or off.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris McKechnie View Post
    You’d be better off with a projector
    Quote Originally Posted by Bastian Meier View Post
    curios what projector you would recommend at the moment
    Yes on the projector. Although out of the OP’s stated price range, I have been thoroughly enjoying the LG HU85 UST 4K HDR projector running at 120”. Obviously the blacks do not come anywhere close to an OLED and most (consumer) projectors can’t go bright enough to do real HDR, but a good projected image is so much more enjoyable and easy to watch than an emissive, direct view display. It’s a much more “mellow” image that has a 3D quality. I can watch my projector for hours and hours on end with no fatigue, but my OLED, as beautiful as it is, quickly wears on me. I use the analogy that watching a good HD/4K direct view display is like looking out a window, but watching a good projected image is like looking out an OPEN window.
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  9. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher A. Bell View Post
    Yes on the projector. Although out of the OP’s stated price range, I have been thoroughly enjoying the LG HU85 UST 4K HDR projector running at 120”. Obviously the blacks do not come anywhere close to an OLED and most (consumer) projectors can’t go bright enough to do real HDR, but a good projected image is so much more enjoyable and easy to watch than an emissive, direct view display. It’s a much more “mellow” image that has a 3D quality. I can watch my projector for hours and hours on end with no fatigue, but my OLED, as beautiful as it is, quickly wears on me. I use the analogy that watching a good HD/4K direct view display is like looking out a window, but watching a good projected image is like looking out an OPEN window.
    I'm not in a rush, so could save up. Are projectors just a better technology to get the best image quality? I can start researching that and figure out a dream setup. You use something like UST Projector screen?
    Thanks.
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  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Fiske View Post
    I'm not in a rush, so could save up. Are projectors just a better technology to get the best image quality? I can start researching that and figure out a dream setup. You use something like UST Projector screen?
    Thanks.
    One of the main things, is that you can get a larger image. Although flat panels are getting larger and less expensive, you're still topping out around 88" or so in the "affordable" category(which could be plenty for your needs/environment). Most people are probably at least at 100" on front projection(I wouldn't go through the trouble for anything smaller). I don't think it's so much a "better technology" standpoint as it is just the difference in the way projected/reflected light works vs. direct. And to be honest, it wasn't something I ever really thought about until I got mine.

    There are also some drawbacks that you have to think about and figure out if you can live with, too, regarding projection. Like ambient light washing the image out(although I can still get very good results with my set-up, even with the blinds open during the day) and proper placement of the screen and projector, since they are two separate pieces, but part of the same system that have to be placed and work in unison. There are "battles" on the home theater forums over regular throw projectors vs. UST's(ultra short throw) with some feeling that UST's are gimmicky or cost too much vs. what you can get with a regular throw. But it all depends on your set-up and needs.

    I suggest heading over to one of the home theater forums, like AVS, and looking around and maybe joining and asking some questions over there. Tons of information and a lot of knowledgeable members. If you think some people on RU and other similar forums are picky about image quality, just dive into the home theater world.

    And yes, I do run a UST screen. It's pretty much a must, otherwise you're kind of throwing your money away. UST's are projecting at such a steep angle, that you have to have a UST screen to reflect the light(image) back to the viewer properly/optimally(Yes, you will still have an on-screen image with a regular screen, but the light/image is just going to "skip" off of a regular screen and end up on the ceiling, causing unnecessary light pollution, hurting your image and viewing experience). Plus, due to their design, they help reject stray/ambient light that may be coming from above the screen and they increase contrast/perceived black levels, because they are "negative gain" screens. Getting into UST projection can cost you more vs. a similar regular throw system, because the projectors are not cheap(expensive wide angle optics do not help) and UST screens are generally way more expensive vs. their regular counterparts. For example, you can find an entry level/budget plain 120" screen for a few hundred bucks, but my 120" UST screen(which is probably one of the least expensive available in the US) is $1300. But to be fair, there are screens designed for regular throw that are many, many thousands of dollars. I guess it kind of all depends on what your end goal is and what your threshold for pain(spending $) is.
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