Thread: Apple Announces Move to Custom ARM Processors in New Macs

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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by rand thompson View Post
    Craig,


    I remember years back when Apple were using I believe Motorola chips before they eventually went to using Intel ones. My 17 inch Macbook Pro 2006 model finally died about 4 years ago, I've been on a PC ever since. I wonder if the "bootcamp" app, that I used to have one partition for mac and another for windows, will be significantly affected by the new Apple chip. Since I'm guessing that Windows probably won't run smoothly or at all with the Apple chip, what will become of it. Also how will this affect "Hackintosh" builds.
    Motorolla along with IBM, I think the G4 and G3 chips were from Motorolla and the G5 was from IBM. I think I got my first Powerbook G4 in early 2005 and that lasted me up until I think 2009 when I got the 17inch Macbook Pro. I remember being skeptical about the Intel transition but It didn't turn out so bad in the end though I suspect this transition to Apple Silicon will go much smoother. Can't go back to PC myself, The feel of it all is too weird for me now and the last time I really used it was when I boot camped Windows 7 onto the 17inch MacBook Pro for a while to play games on steam.

    I don't know what will happen to Hackintosh builds but I suspect they will die out along with Intel support when the time comes. Who knows what will happen to Windows on the Mac, maybe Windows ARM will get better and that will run and maybe you'll just have to run in emulation the way you would have to in the PowerPC days.
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  2. #22  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Craig,


    Yeah, it was kind of strange going back to the PC and Windows after being on the Mac for so long. I had to remember to defragment my harddrive on the PC on fairly regular time intervals, about ever month or so. The Mac, if I remember correctly, did that automatically. Also, I personally never really had any real instability problems with programs on the Mac.And if I ever got a significant virus on the Windows partition in Bootcamp, I would just reclaim that partition space back for the Mac in Bootcamp. I would just use Snow Leopard until I felt like reinstalling Windows after repartitioning the harddrive back into two partitions again.

    The main reason I personally went back to PC was because at the time my Macbook died and I was looking to replace it with another Macbook, the screens went down to a max size of 15 inches when I had just come from a 17 inch screen. Also when I compared the current offering for a new Macbook against the curren offerings from a 17 inch screen high performance laptop on the PC, the 17 inch MSI GTS Dominator Pro I have now, there was really no comparison unless I went to a Mac desktop.


    So hopely Apple will make a Macbook Pro that will bring all the former Macbook pro owners back from our high end PCs, atleast I hope so.
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  3. #23  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Inside The New Apple Silicon: The ARM architecture.


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    ExpovistaTV





    What are the advantages of the new Apple silicon vs the Intel processors? During his keynote at the last ARM gathering, before Apple WWDC 2020, ARM CEO gave an overview of what the new technology has to offer, especially in a 5G and IoT environment.
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  4. #24  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Apple ARM Processor vs Intel x86 Performance and Power Efficiency - Is the MAC Doomed?



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    Graphically Challenged


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  5. #25  
    I ended up going to a 15inch Macbook Pro with Retina display in the end which I am still using. At the time I think my battery was going to the point where I couldn't switch to the more powerful graphics processor in battery mode. I was using it once when it switched off all of a sudden and wouldn't turn on again. Apparently I had fried the logic board so I had to get a new laptop and the Retina Macbook Pro was the logical choice for me.
    Moving from a 17inch to a 15inch screen took a bit of getting used to but I got there in the end, though really I just got an external display for things like watching a video, I've got a 43inch 1080p HDR TV though only 2016 MacBooks and newer I guess support HDR so I guess that's not much use to me. I do like the new 16inch Macbooks Pro so I've been lusting after one, and I'm not sure if I want to wait for the Apple Silicon update which could be sometime next year or try to pick up basically a default intel one, or at least one with a 32GB ram upgrade.
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  6. #26  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Craig,

    Yeah the 16 inch display Macbooks have peaked my interest in macbook pros again. I had the Macbook with the dangerous expanding battery. I kept hearing noises, little snaps and cracking sounds, for a while until I realized the battery had expanded and lifted my Macbbok off the cooling pad it was on. However, by this time my macbook was long past the Applecare warranty I had on it.

    Currently my PC MSI GT72S Dominator Pro which is about 3 years old is what I use to edit and color correct with. It came with a Nvidia GtX 980M graphics card with 8GB of Ram. I added both a NVME M.2 Samsung 970 Pro and a NVME M.2 Samsung 960 Pro, the 970 Pro as a Boot drive and 970 for storage. Along with these two, I added a Samsung 850 EVO solid state Sata drive also for storage.

    At the time my 2006 macbook 17 inch died, I couldn't find a macbook that first allowed me to upgrade it because of the Uni-body and secondly a macbook that had equal performance to MSI PC Laptop, you would have had to go to a Mac Desktop for anything close.

    An Intel based Macbook pro might be the last Macs that will allow you to run Windows on Bootcamp smoothly or at all. Like you, I think if there is a current new Macbook Pro with an Intel processor in it , I would prefer to get that than an Arm based Macbook that may or may not show up by the end of this year. Who knows when the Arm based versions will support all the programs most of us use and when they will match the benchmarks and performance of the current models
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  7. #27  
    Senior Member Terry VerHaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rand thompson View Post
    Apple ARM Processor vs Intel x86 Performance and Power Efficiency - Is the MAC Doomed?



    By
    Graphically Challenged


    Some people don't think so...

    "Microsoft's Steven Sinofsky calls Apple Silicon strategy 'fearless'."

    https://apple.news/AcTxIJZXZReW5yTs0qy9QgQ
    Scarlet Dragon
    Scarlet-W
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  8. #28  
    Senior Member Antony Newman's Avatar
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    If Microsoft are going to make a tidy profit from sales of Office running natively on ARM for MacOS - perhaps there is no incentive for them to bolster WoA just yet?

    They could use the next couple of year to perfect their own ARM software offerings, and wait for a higher end commodity ARM SoC (using high performing ARM Cortex-X1's rather then the just released and token improvement 'Snapdragon 8cx Plus') to appear before making another WoA push.

    By that time - they might even move from the restrictive licences that requires WoA comes preinstalled on the Hardware (one of the things that might lock out WoA on a Mac).


    As Bootcamp sales could be decimated - it would not surprise me if they try build a low level simulator for where Rosetta fails to support their needs.
    Even if it runs 5 times slower, there is going to be maket.

    Perhaps what we will see is more companies 'doing a MS' and finally porting their software over?

    AJ
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  9. #29  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Anthony,


    Bootcamp was one of the main reasons for me to buy my macbook. I would be getting a mac and a PC all-in-one. If bootcamp is rendered useless with the new ARM silicon, that would make their well known higher prices in relation to an equivalent PC Laptop harder to stomach.
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  10. #30  
    Senior Member Antony Newman's Avatar
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    I have heard interviews that imply Apple don’t want to restrict hobbyists (ie people doing things that involve turning off inbuilt MacOS defences) - and at the same time the ratcheting up of BigSurs security to ensure that (possibly with leveraging and ARM SoC Enclave) that the OS has not been tampered with on startup.

    My expectation at this point is that Bootcamp-like software will be allowed to run - that Bootcamp will need to write some pretty tricky software that would need to do in real time what Rosetta did during install time, and more. I have not read up on enthusiast / Bootcamp teams views on this - but wouldn’t be surprised if it takes a team 10-18months to get something written and fully tested from scratch.

    Cavium do have some level of x86 emulation on ARM already; Ironically though - the most robust (real time) x86 emulator (On ARM) is part of the Microsofts Windows 10 on ARM offering (its called WOW64). I am sure we will hear more about what various teams intend to do; If they don’t keep potential customers in the loop - they could find people make plans without them...

    AJ
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