Thread: Color Grading Workflow

Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1 Color Grading Workflow 
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    2
    I'm very new to RED, just got a Helium last month and have been gathering sample footage. I use Premiere, and previously I have just used adjustment layers in Premiere. I know this is largely based on preference, but was wondering if people had better success using Davinci or even the RED program. Just curious about whatever yields the best results (I know this is largely based on preference and bias), I just want to get as close to the crisp "cinematic look" as possible. I have also used Lutify LUT's in the past, but curious if any advice can be given on a better LUT pack. Thanks guys, any guidance would be much appreciated, cheers.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    This is such a broad question, hard to cover in one post or even one thread. Cinematic image is created by camera only in maybe 20-30%. Rest is your usual composition, lightning, glass in front of sensor, diffusion etc.

    What type of work do you do? Coloring? Editing? All of it? What app do you prefer? Are you on mac or win? Do you have any experience with raw images development? Can your system handle raw? What are you deliverables?

    Short answer would be use Resolve, Develop your RAW image via RAW tab and use IPP2 workflow. RedWideGammut and LOG3G10 gamma. Color transform your now LOG footage to REC709 via CST/LUT. Phill Holland has nice LUT packs just for this and RED on their site as well. Both come with some look flavours.

    But this is really only one of many ways for some of the workflows.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member Aaron Lochert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    1,140
    This definitely can be a long answer so I'll just keep it short to my preferences.

    I have a Helium and I am using Resolve. Node based workflows really are my preferred workflow rather than layers in Premiere.

    LUTs -- you might want to look into philmColor or Primers. PhilmColor for a look library or Primers if you just want to line some things up for further grading on top. I've had good success with both, depending on the project.

    I'm personally not the biggest fan of the more drastic looks you can get out of some of the other LUT sellers. I think they go too far in trashing the image beyond repair and would rather get there myself via less destructive grading.

    I'd be curious to know what you mean by "crisp cinematic look," as I could point to a thousand different examples of cinema that is "crisp" but has a completely different aesthetic as far as color is concerned.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    11,658
    I"ll come in with the general perspective of ideally what should set you on a good path. At the moment DaVinci Resolve is the most accessible professional color grading software. In terms of price of entry and even ease of use, I'd recommend starting your education and getting comfortable there. Premiere Pro is certainly streamlined for fast workflows and I'm hoping they expand it's color grading capability down the line. But in terms of depth, dedicated grading platforms provide a lot more.

    I make LUTs and kudos to Aaron for the shout out. My general perspective with specifically my Creative Cube LUTs for IPP2 is to get you to a place rather quickly and either give you something you immediately like or spend just a bit of time tweaking your REDCODE RAW settings like White Balance, ISO, and perhaps things like curves to get you to a place you're happy with. I've spent and continue to spend a great deal of time crafting these "targets".

    Generally speaking a good LUT gets you somewhere quicker and an even better LUT allows for some flexibility from there. But the depth of knowledge you can develop down your path of learning color grading is well worth the journey. A lot of my LUT customers are colorists even. They sort of understand when you need to get their faster or even just quickly go through a bunch of look options to get inspired to go from there.
    Phil Holland - Cinematographer - Los Angeles
    ________________________________
    phfx.com IMDB
    PHFX | tools

    2X RED Monstro 8K VV Bodies and a lot of things to use with them.

    Data Sheets and Notes:
    Red Weapon/DSMC2
    Red Dragon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    2
    Great. Thank you for your response, much appreciated!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    I'll offer two suggestions. First, when you bring RED footage into Resolve, default to using Remote Grades, not Local Grades. The former give you the ability to adjust ISO and WB in one place and have it affect all the little clips that may derive from a single shot. Local grades give you the ability to dissociate clips from the underlying media, but it can be very tedious when you realize that all your grading problems come down to bad ISO and WB and you have to make that same correction across dozens of clips scattered across many timelines. (You can read more generally about this by searching for "Remote Grade" in the Resolve manual.)

    Second, I suggest you check out the awesome "Split Screen" view in the Color page. You can create a number of versions of your grade (or save a number of still images) and then use Split Screen to view the grades or stills (applied as if they were grades) all side-by-side. Can be really handy when trying to make decisions.
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,181
    Redcine-x is worth learning. You can do some pretty amazing things with it. The Red SDK used in Resolve and other NLE’s covers most if not all of the same functions for basic grades.
    I think it is useful to distinguish between basic raw conversion color corrections and color space transforms VS creative grades for looks.
    Phil’s LUTs are amazing and LUTS are useful shortcuts sometimes.
    But take the time to learn the basics of managing color space conversions in Resolve and correcting exposure, gamma, white balance, color saturation, etc. in Resolve’s raw processing menus.
    Personally, I think BM turning Resolve into a one stop do everything app has greatly complicated the setup and learning process. The friggin manual is like 1600 pages. I still just use it for color grading and transcoding to a DI master for editing in a more efficient NLE.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by David Rasberry View Post
    [...]
    Personally, I think BM turning Resolve into a one stop do everything app has greatly complicated the setup and learning process. The friggin manual is like 1600 pages. I still just use it for color grading and transcoding to a DI master for editing in a more efficient NLE.
    The manual is 3,335 pages at last count...
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,181
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Tiemann View Post
    The manual is 3,335 pages at last count...
    Ouch! I’m still running v15.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Tags for this Thread

View Tag Cloud

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts