Thread: Super 35 isn't going anywhere

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  1. #1 Super 35 isn't going anywhere 
    Senior Member Karim D. Ghantous's Avatar
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    Change my mind.
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member Christoffer Glans's Avatar
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    As long as cinema exists as an artform of cinematography through actual light capture of the real world, then no, it will exist as long as we have great glass for it. There's too much good glass that only covers super 35 for it to disappear.

    Actually, I hope that full-frame gets so popular that old super expensive s35 glass drops in price.
    "Using any digital cinema camera today is like sending your 35mm rolls to a standard lab. -Using a Red is like owning a dark room."
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member Patrick Tresch's Avatar
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    For some projects I look at s16mm sensors but they get rare on good cameras with 4k to 6k res.
    The more tools we have available the better it gets.
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  4. #4  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    It very much isn't going anywhere.

    Super 35mm is the backbone of the motion picture industry.

    However, the biggest change to the digital cinematography landscape has been the availability of sensors that are closer to the variety of the film formats we had access to for decades. During that time as well, Super 35mm-ish was the most popular format.

    The variance there is if I was working with VistaVision film I wouldn't necessarily have gone for a Super 35mm extraction, I would have chosen a Super 35mm camera in the first place because it would be extremely cost inefficient to film that way. The way digital works however, particularly in the world of RED and many others now as well, is you can have a large format digital cinema camera and still have access to relevant formats and resolutions by windowing down on the sensor. The only real wiggle would be the potential rental cost or purchase price variation of the camera itself, but in terms of workflow much easier and more efficient.

    Monstro owner here who still owns Super 35mm lenses, though mostly filming VV these days because that format has always spoken to me. Will still film S35, heck might two weeks from now even.
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  5. #5  
    It is going somewhere. It already has. It has gone to a lesser role and will continue to do so as "FF" or "LF" expands. Already at this point it would be unwise for an owner / op to buy a camera that doesn't shoot FF, if they are ever hired because of the type of camera they own.

    And yes, our Super 35 glass is dropping in value because of the spread of FF. I might be able to afford to buy a set of Super Speeds before long. But do I still want to? Does S35 glass already have one toe into "obsolete"? I know of a someone who, seeing the writing on the wall well over a year ago, wisely dumped all his S35-only glass. Even his cherished Super Speeds. We've all seen criticism of newly announced lenses of "but it doesn't cover FF" and that kills it for many right there.
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member Jeffery Anderson's Avatar
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    you're definitely getting a different look with Full Frame... I think at the moment a lot of people are playing catch up and a larger sensor does contributes to a cleaner look

    are theaters going to have larger displays and support higher resolutions? Probably...

    does this propose that a movie shot on a higher resolution with a larger sensor will look better on a larger screen? Probably...

    right now we're coming out of the vintage, nostalgic era of filmmaking and soon, maybe, we'll have some new shit to talk about
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member Michael Lindsay's Avatar
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    I don’t think it is going anywhere... but I was wrong before as I felt s16 wasn’t going anywhere!

    Ps would still love to see a great digital s16 camera
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  8. #8  
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    My favorite sensor size is actually in between. Best of both worlds.
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member Karim D. Ghantous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christoffer Glans View Post
    Actually, I hope that full-frame gets so popular that old super expensive s35 glass drops in price.
    A good rule of thumb: when you see photographers putting their tripods down in the same spot, go in a different direction. ;-)


    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Tresch View Post
    For some projects I look at s16mm sensors but they get rare on good cameras with 4k to 6k res.
    The more tools we have available the better it gets.
    True. And true.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Holland View Post
    The way digital works however, particularly in the world of RED and many others now as well, is you can have a large format digital cinema camera and still have access to relevant formats and resolutions by windowing down on the sensor. The only real wiggle would be the potential rental cost or purchase price variation of the camera itself, but in terms of workflow much easier and more efficient.
    Very good points.

    Quote Originally Posted by John David Pope View Post
    We've all seen criticism of newly announced lenses of "but it doesn't cover FF" and that kills it for many right there.
    This sentiment might last, it might not. But it does exist.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffery Anderson View Post
    you're definitely getting a different look with Full Frame... I think at the moment a lot of people are playing catch up and a larger sensor does contributes to a cleaner look
    Yes, because you have more resolution and a cleaner image at higher ISO - together. No question there. It's basically just more, more, more, if you want it. And why not?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Lindsay View Post
    I don’t think it is going anywhere... but I was wrong before as I felt s16 wasn’t going anywhere!

    Ps would still love to see a great digital s16 camera
    It's still around - for film. For digital? Hmm, maybe not so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Wilganowski View Post
    My favorite sensor size is actually in between. Best of both worlds.
    Like the Dragon 6K? That makes sense. Some S35 lenses do cover it.
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  10. #10  
    Senior Member Alex Lubensky's Avatar
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    It will stay. The lenses are smaller and lighter, and you don’t always need the most shallow depth of field. Lighting for 2 and 3-shots with the same depth of field on VV/LF is challenging at least - you have to put more light to achieve normal depth on those. Personally, I feel comfortable with the lens choises of s35 - going from 20 to 75 is the way I’m used to work. Longer lenses are way too big and heavy on VV/LF. You have to use something like 150 instead of 75 most of the times, which is also challenging in some way. Achieving normal depth on 150mm is also a little bit tricky.


    Lens rentals for s35 will become cheaper though, which is an advantage for DPs, and maybe not so much for rentals.
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