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  1. #1 Filmmaker Mode - UHD Alliance 
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    I've written a lot about this topic over the years and it's a conversation among the filmmaking community that has been growing in momentum as HD and UHD televisions have become in many ways apart of the premiere experience when it comes to watching films, more relevant now than ever in this streaming era. But this topic has had a long history.
    This is an extension of a conversation among filmmakers back when film projection was the primary way to experience a project. Frustrations grew about print variation, degradation, and inconsistent theatrical experiences.

    We're now at a point where filmmaker's intentions towards how an audience should experience a project can be provided somewhat consistently in the comfort of their home. I fully agree and have even had the chat with a couple of the filmmakers here, this is long overdue and the overall efforts have my full support.

    Though the broad impact and exposure of Tom Cruise's crusade against Motion Smoothing certainly helped build general awareness. This is also about accurate Color, and Aspect Ratio as well as Frame Rate. We've seen a few efforts on this front already, but now it's nice to see a bit more of an organized concept being put forth.

    Some of this will indeed be counter intuitive towards where technology might be going in showing off every feature of a modern television, but this growing effort will be extremely positive in the quality of the ideal viewing experience loaded with the intents of how the filmmakers want you to see what they've put very hard work in producing.



    https://www.slashfilm.com/filmmaker-mode-details/

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/be...etting-1234968

    There has always been a noticeable difference of seeing a finished painting in person versus a reproduced print. Same content that you enjoy, but certainly a different experience when you really see it. On the filmmaking side many have been yearning to get people closer to the actual finished image even in reproduction. Slowly but surely, we are getting there.

    With films premiering via streaming it's incredibly important. With films that have been around for decades it's extremely important. And I'll add one more, for discerning fans of films they may have seen many times and will re-watch many times in the future, this is potentially most important to them.
    Last edited by Phil Holland; 08-28-2019 at 12:04 AM.
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  2. #2  
    This is the best news ever. I have been on a crusade to adjust studio execs TVs for some years. This is certainly a huge step forward
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  3. #3 Hi-Fi video 
    Senior Member Blair S. Paulsen's Avatar
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    Improving the fidelity of viewer's experiences is overdue. Filmmaker Mode looks to be a significant step in the right direction. What about the rest of the PQ equation?

    UHD HDR displays >65" (nominally rec 2020 compliant, 98% of P3 please) provide the potential for legit home viewing experiences previously capped by limitations in display tech. As prices drop and older sets are replaced, the population of viewers with devices capable of reproducing high fidelity images is likely to expand dramatically.

    IAC, it's actually the delivery chain that typically mauls picture quality, primarily via over compression and concatenation (common artifact of re-compressing compressed material). Broadcasters, cable/satellite distribution infrastructure and other stakeholders have resisted anything that might increase their costs with no promise of commensurate increases in revenue. With heavyweights like Apple and Disney jumping into streaming, the era of multi-channel linear distribution topologies as the dominant model is ebbing fast. If the streamers see PQ, or at least UHD resolution, as marketing leverage - perhaps the days of compressing material to 5mb/s will mercifully end.

    As companies tend to do, the major MSO players have been busy developing point to point solutions based on IP (Internet Protocol) at the same time that they were milking the last revenue out of their existing infrastructure. Providing bandwidth (and perhaps a low cost local TV feed), for whatever purpose, will be their value add. Fortunately for US consumers, the impending roll out of 5G has the potential to provide broadband competition to wired services that have been the only game in most towns for years. Unfortunately, to potentially avoid real competition that could impact margins, both vertical and horizontal consolidation in the media & entertainment space is the new normal.

    IAC, I don't expect actual costs at the consumer level to go down much or for long. What we should all expect, and frankly demand, is that the content we are served over IP is distributed at a minimum of 20mb/s for UHD (AFAIK, typical network feeds are around 4mb/s for HD) with premium services >40mb/s. Even newer codecs require a certain amount of bandwidth to avoid artifacts from bit starvation, especially since UHD is four times more pixels than HD.

    I'll close my rant with a plea for displays, codecs, distribution infrastructure, etc to make 10 bits the minimum standard. I've yet to see nice looking HDR from 8 bit sources and I'm dubious that any effort to deliver what Filmmaker Mode, UHD Premium, etc promise will exist without leaving 8bit land. BTW, 12 bits "should" be the standard for premium fare...

    Cheers - #19
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Karim D. Ghantous's Avatar
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    Better late than never! Took them fucking long enough to do something like this, though. I'd be happy enough if those stupid frame interpolation modes were turned off by default.

    BTW I do very much like listening to Scorsese's voice. He's a terrific narrator.
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member jake blackstone's Avatar
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    A while ago, there was already testing done for something very similar to a proposed "Filmmaker mode", where all visual enhancements, including motion smoothing, were disabled. Unfortunately, many viewers complained, because they wanted to be able to adjust those settings themself.
    Consumers want what consumers want...
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  6. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake blackstone View Post
    A while ago, there was already testing done for something very similar to a proposed "Filmmaker mode", where all visual enhancements, including motion smoothing, were disabled. Unfortunately, many viewers complained, because they wanted to be able to adjust those settings themself.
    Actually, the ISF mode on the LG sets also turns off most of this stuff, including motion-compensation, noise-reduction, and enhancement. I've never heard any complaints from anybody when these unnecessary modes were turned off.

    I'm 100% for the Filmmaker Mode, and anything that at least pushes the image closer to where it needs to be is a good thing.
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member jake blackstone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    Actually, the ISF mode on the LG sets also turns off most of this stuff, including motion-compensation, noise-reduction, and enhancement. I've never heard any complaints from anybody when these unnecessary modes were turned off.

    I'm 100% for the Filmmaker Mode, and anything that at least pushes the image closer to where it needs to be is a good thing.
    The info I provided comes directly from well respected authority in the monitor manufacturer. They already had done the research and their market research doesn't support your conclusions based on a couple of anecdotal responses. If you ask anyone here, myself included, 99% of respondents will reply in the affirmative to the question of FilmMaker mode. Unfortunately, no one gives two shits what you or anyone here feels. Majority of home users want bright, colorful, HFR imagers and no alliance is going to change that. You can't legislate taste or respect for the original images. Manufacturers will only listen to what market tells them. Occasionally they will read market wrong (3D) but at the end of the day TV manufacturers will make TV sets with features users want and from the research I mentioned, buyers do not like to be told how they MUST watch pictures on TVs they own.
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  8. #8  
    I though dolby vision already did this, plus hdr and best possible color setting for the given tv model, no? Seams like this filmakermode is a bit short in comparision, no?
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  9. #9  
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    Give people both the "filmmaker mode" and the "soap opera mode", everybody happy.
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  10. #10  
    Senior Member Karim D. Ghantous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake blackstone View Post
    buyers do not like to be told how they MUST watch pictures on TVs they own.
    Nobody is saying this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Misha Engel View Post
    Give people both the "filmmaker mode" and the "soap opera mode", everybody happy.
    Agreed. If motion smoothing is an option (which ought to be off by default) then Filmmaker Mode can be an option, too. Life can be simple. :-)
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