Thread: Panasonic LUMIX S1H Full Overview 6K Test Footage and System Review First Look

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  1. #21  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Lumix S1H “Awakening” (UHD-HDR)


    By Matthias Bolliger






    directing DoP: Matthias Bolliger
    matthias-bolliger.de








    Lumix S1H “Awakening” (UHD-SDR)



    By Matthias Bolliger



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  2. #22  
    Senior Member Fabricio Morato's Avatar
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    This little camera has my attention!

    What a great time to be shopping for an affordable B cam.
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  3. #23  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Quick Auto Focus Test of the Panasonic Lumix S1H | 4K



    By Darryl Carey








    A little bit of fun with the Panasonic Lumix S1H and the Panasonic Lumix 24-105mm f/4, 70-200mm f/4 and the Lumix S-Pro 50mm f/1.4
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  4. #24  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    DPReview TV: Panasonic S1H First Look



    By DPReview






    Jordan takes a first look at the new Panasonic S1H and wrestles with the moral struggle of cheating on his beloved GH5. Click below to download some ungraded sample clips from the S1H, including 6K footage.
    https://www.dpreview.com/videos/92819...

    Special thanks to Nick Thomas
    http://www.nickthomasdp.com
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  5. #25  
    Senior Member Karim D. Ghantous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon Veen View Post
    Not to go too off topic, but it certainly makes one wonder if DSMC3 will have an L Mount option.
    The one thing that Leica has done better than anyone else since the M3 is lens mounts. Prepare for hyperbole: F is a disaster, EF is committee designed '80s industrial design junk, Z and RF are not bad but not the best, either. FE is awesome but is limited to VistaVision, which L is not (). Micro 4/3 is very much suited to its task - it is the most limited but it doesn't pretend.

    PL is way to long, and a film hangover, but you need it for older lenses. You can't get around that, unless you want to mess with the rear elements of your Super Speeds. (Can you do that?).

    If RED goes the full 645... I wonder if they will have to invent a new mount for that, or if they can use the Fuji or Hasselblad mounts.
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  6. #26  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karim D. Ghantous View Post
    lens mounts
    Sitting across from me right this very second are around 20 of the approximate 50 lens mounts from over the years. All created for different purposes, formats, etc. Before the internet, DSLRs, and the proliferation of inexpensive mount adapters using different mount lens on other mounts was a very uncommon thing. Though I suspect somewhere likely in the 50s or so cinematographers were looking for creative solutions on the optics front.

    I would guess that every manufacturer wasn't exactly focused on making their mounts compatible with other's. In fact, likely the polar opposite intention was used to keep you buying within a specific ecosystem.

    Canon EF and Nikon F sort of became the most widely adopted mainly due to the popularity of the cameras. Once people started mainly sharing their thoughts online about lens adaption and modification it became apparent to large audiences that you could adapt a whole lot of glass to Canon EF Mount, even vintage Nikon F. It became a sort of universally popular mount for the lens tinkerers out there because of it's broad compatibility with only a few hang ups. Much like many feel about the mirrorless shorter flange distances these days.

    In terms of diameter of the mount and flange distance, there's always going to be some concessions made about exactly what you can do for a specific format size. As you mention, PL's longer flange distance was mainly due to film's need for space for the shutter and gate related mischief. Though some will view it as bulky, this length allows for other things like behind the lens ND, speed boosters, and easy adaption to many systems. Also you can design lenses fairly easily with the exit pupil that can cover a generously large image circle without absolutely torturing the light rays and image quality in the process.

    Interestingly the shorter flange distances allow for other potential gains. Smaller optics, potentially more compact lenses, possibly higher speed optical designs, easier to correct optics particularly on the wide angle side of things, and a benefit to manufacturers is generally speaking a lower core material cost.

    There's a fairly large usage gap between lenses made for all formats on the still side of things versus for motion. Namely how we work with them and the core goal of producing a still image versus motion pictures. Mainly of the still mounts were focused on speedy changes when out shooting as well as keeping the mechanism simple and lightweight. Bayonet with pin registration with a button or lever release was a nice solution for many. Though we've learned quickly that the addition of a locking collar can greatly improve these often thinner metal mounts performance for motion picture use.

    For cinema the one true standard of PL (thus far) rose to the top expanding on that reason. Robustness. A good PL mount lens uses likely steal and not aluminum. The pin registration and locking collar can handle a lot of torque and weight without rod support. We've seen this manifest in lens manufacturers who do offer multiple mount lenses include rod support even on shorter primes as something like a follow focus could possible move the lens within the mount, whereas on a thicker secure PL mount you traditionally don't even need lens support until a lens is fairly long and heavy. Strangely that weird moment where the older bulkier solution might actually save time and bulk in some other directions for those focused on image quality.

    Until digital cinema cameras "all get there", which will eventually happen within the next few years I think, the need for a shorter PL-like standard won't truly be needed. And this will be a dance of not going to short, but also coming up with a reasonable diameter to support various formats. LPL for instance is mainly due to the unique properties of the Signature Series Primes (specifically a few of the wider designs) to keep the physical lenses shorter and not wider diameter than the rest of the series, it is in fact more or less the same distance as Canon's EF Mount. This is despite many of us understanding that there's obviously a host of other high quality optics that cover FF35, VV, LF and larger even with longer flange distance mounts.


    Circling this back around and on topic. The L-Series Alliance was birthed for a variety of reasons from my perspective. As I mentioned, manufacturers want to lock you into a mount and even when exploring other company's mount technology sometimes requires licensing agreements and fees. L was first introduced by Leica in 2014 and though a popular brand, alone in it's ecosystem and compatibility. Looking forward to 2018 when the L Alliance formed the changing landscape of the industry became pretty clear. With Sony as a growing brand in stills and motion and also influencing the path of several other well known brands of cameras and lenses as well as Canon's own future intentions with RF Mount; it was clear Leica and Panasonic who both make cameras, but also make up a smaller segment wanted to not play ball with two of the large and main competitors in this space. Sigma was the X factor there as their cameras faced a similar problem, but at the same time Sigma's rise is purely due to them making optics for other's mounts. And in recent years their heavy investment in making lower cost, high quality optics has been commercially very well received. When they joined the L Alliance it was pretty clear that a camera would soon follow as it would allow them to break free from competitors by working with other likely eventual competitors in an effort to build.

    Strategically I think this is a great move for the immediate future to help all three brands build in the face of juggernauts in this arena. Cross compatibility between Panasonic, Leica, and Sigma cameras with the same glass will be a nice thing. I also think that since L-Mount is the same flange distance as RF and you can design on the lens interchangeable mounts to play nicely with that mount without major issues and also through a rather thin adapter or even a different mount on the lens also potentially work with E-Mount and if the desire is there, Z-Mount.

    It's still really early on in the shorter flange stuff, a lot of new glass is incoming as well as cameras.


    Side note, I wrote this post while eating an avocado with pepper and salt while staring at many lenses. Sorry for the long winded reply. It's pretty relevant stuff in the world of smaller cameras and what's coming from Panasonic, Sigma, and we'll see whatever Leica does in this space.
    Phil Holland - Cinematographer - Los Angeles
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  7. #27  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Phil,

    I'm just waiting for you to write your definitive book on the history of digital filmography ," The Evolution of Resolution". And I'm sure it will be a very good read.
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  8. #28  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Panasonic S1H 6K Full Frame Camera has everything you want for video shooting! Hands-on Review




    By Lok Cheung



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  9. #29  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rand thompson View Post
    Phil,

    I'm just waiting for you to write your definitive book on the history of digital filmography ," The Evolution of Resolution". And I'm sure it will be a very good read.
    Heh. One day. I was extremely fortunate to break into this industry in my late teens in the late 90s and be surrounded by a large amount of industry professionals with 30-50 years experience. Some of whom built some of the core foundation of motion picture production today. I was all ears and eyes with a good set of hands back then. Learned more during that first decade on features than I imagine I could of in any other avenue. A very unique and special experience.

    It freaks me out sometimes because I remember when the old studio hit 4TB of storage facility wide which was a huge deal and I stare at the 2+ petabytes around me. Not to mention the extreme lack of film archives in my life these days. I do sort of miss the quiet of cutting color wedges in the vault, but don't miss the tedious nature of that work for sure.
    Phil Holland - Cinematographer - Los Angeles
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    2X RED Monstro 8K VV Bodies and a lot of things to use with them.

    Data Sheets and Notes:
    Red Weapon/DSMC2
    Red Dragon
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  10. #30  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Phil,


    But seriously, with your unique experience if not a book, perhaps you would consider a few paid downloadable webinars about different aspects of modern digital film cameras and other relative topics. Just a thought.
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