Thread: 2.37:1 Aspect ratio

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  1. #1 2.37:1 Aspect ratio 
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    Silly question maybe but I seem to be confusing myself. There's no 2.37:1 aspect export for the internet right? Like, if you want it to show properly on vimeo, youtube, etc you'd need to do the proper 2.35:1 dimensions for it to be recognized?

    Is there any perks to working with 2.37:1 with RED footage? Also I read something about 2.00 which is REDs official aspect for House of Cards?

    Trying to clear up aspect ratios basically before I shoot a film this summer. I want a crop like 2.35:1 because I will need more room to hide things in the frame on our budget.

    Appreciate any insight!
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  2. #2  
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    The proper format for theatrical release is 2.39:1 (not 2.37, that was back in film days). Anything that isn't one of those two would be fit into those aspects via letterboxing or pillarboxing. Anything that isn't being distributed theatrically can basically be any aspect ratio you want, with the caveat that for some distribution channels, it might need to fit into a 16x9 container using by using letterboxing or pillarboxing.

    The original DCI spec had only two release aspect ratios, 1.85:1 and 2.39:1, both flat (i.e., not anamorphic), and at 24fps. It has been expanded to include some other aspect ratios and frame rates, but earlier digital cinema servers - still in use in some theaters - only support the original spec.
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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by M Most View Post
    The proper format for theatrical release is 2.39:1 (not 2.37, that was back in film days). Anything that isn't one of those two would be fit into those aspects via letterboxing or pillarboxing. Anything that isn't being distributed theatrically can basically be any aspect ratio you want, with the caveat that for some distribution channels, it might need to fit into a 16x9 container using by using letterboxing or pillarboxing.

    The original DCI spec had only two release aspect ratios, 1.85:1 and 2.39:1, both flat (i.e., not anamorphic), and at 24fps. It has been expanded to include some other aspect ratios and frame rates, but earlier digital cinema servers - still in use in some theaters - only support the original spec.
    Knowing our release will be primarily online like Vimeo and yourube and possibly Amazon Prime I'll assume a 16:9 container is the best to work with. I'll crop to 2.35:1 in a 16:9 container.

    Appreciate your insight!
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  4. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyler Besh View Post
    Knowing our release will be primarily online like Vimeo and yourube and possibly Amazon Prime I'll assume a 16:9 container is the best to work with. I'll crop to 2.35:1 in a 16:9 container.
    We usually suggest to non-theatrical clients that they go with 2.40, because then it's an even-number of masking lines top and bottom and there's no danger of screwing it up. There is no visible difference between 2.39 and 2.40 (and 2.35 is not often used these days).

    There are some weird aspect ratios that pop up in contemporary TV shows nowadays, and I've definitely seen 2.00 used in certain dramatic shows. I have mixed feelings about it, but ultimately the content trumps everything, and if it's well-acted and well-written, I'm not even going to notice the aspect ratio after enough time.

    Netflix has some good explanations on aspect ratios in their vendor documentation, and they basically say "we recommend you stick to standard aspect ratios like 1.78 or 2.40, but we're willing to discuss other aspect ratios on a show-by-show basis." And there are shows where they jump around and change aspect ratios right in the middle of scenes, like Legion, which can be a pretty bold and interesting choice when it's done well.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    We usually suggest to non-theatrical clients that they go with 2.40, because then it's an even-number of masking lines top and bottom and there's no danger of screwing it up. There is no visible difference between 2.39 and 2.40 (and 2.35 is not often used these days).

    There are some weird aspect ratios that pop up in contemporary TV shows nowadays, and I've definitely seen 2.00 used in certain dramatic shows. I have mixed feelings about it, but ultimately the content trumps everything, and if it's well-acted and well-written, I'm not even going to notice the aspect ratio after enough time.

    Netflix has some good explanations on aspect ratios in their vendor documentation, and they basically say "we recommend you stick to standard aspect ratios like 1.78 or 2.40, but we're willing to discuss other aspect ratios on a show-by-show basis." And there are shows where they jump around and change aspect ratios right in the middle of scenes, like Legion, which can be a pretty bold and interesting choice when it's done well.
    Big info, appreciate this Marc.
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