View Poll Results: Which software model do you prefer?

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  • Pay to Play (Adobe CC for example)

    13 17.33%
  • Perpetual (Yearly update fees)

    12 16.00%
  • Buy It Own It (free updates)

    45 60.00%
  • I prefer Open Source software

    5 6.67%

Thread: Subscriptions

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  1. #11  
    Calculating chances of perpetual dependency on subscription and third party and constant feeding of the Corporatosaurus for access to working tools:

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    Result : 0
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member Jaime Vallés's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Holland View Post
    For many professionals it's just a monthly expense not thought about...
    That's where I am right now. If I'm not able to cover the $53/month with paid jobs, then I'm not really working. The subscription model is what made it possible for me to get into the Adobe suite in the first place. I regularly use Premiere, Lightroom, Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator, and I'm dabbling in After Effects. The cost of the Adobe Master Suite was something like $2400, and there was no way I would have been able to pay for that all at once. But $50 per month? No sweat. And this way, I never have to worry about "Should I upgrade to the latest version? What am I giving up if I don't?"

    That said, if you're only interested in Premiere, then I understand if the subscription model doesn't make sense for you. But for me, using all those programs for paid gigs daily, it's a bargain.
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member David Collard's Avatar
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    The subscription model is certainly working for companies like Adobe, so it's highly unlikely they're going to move away from that.

    Most software is so bloated now it's almost as if you are forced to continually update to adapt to updated operating systems etc.

    Pay to Play and yearly licences seem here to stay.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member Steve Sherrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaime Vallés View Post
    That's where I am right now. If I'm not able to cover the $53/month with paid jobs, then I'm not really working. The subscription model is what made it possible for me to get into the Adobe suite in the first place. I regularly use Premiere, Lightroom, Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator, and I'm dabbling in After Effects. The cost of the Adobe Master Suite was something like $2400, and there was no way I would have been able to pay for that all at once. But $50 per month? No sweat. And this way, I never have to worry about "Should I upgrade to the latest version? What am I giving up if I don't?"

    That said, if you're only interested in Premiere, then I understand if the subscription model doesn't make sense for you. But for me, using all those programs for paid gigs daily, it's a bargain.
    I agree, at the current rate it's not really the money that's the problem. It's the principle. There's no option to own. Even if you never wanted an update or upgrade again in the future (not realistic, but just illustrative) you do not have the option to do that. You have to pay to play. Now, at that amount, no worries. What happens if it suddenly goes up to $125/Month next year. Then $250/month the year after. And then $400/month the year after. I'm not saying Adobe will do that, but is there anything stopping them? Perhaps there is. Aside from the rage it would cause from their user base, there's also the competition. So, I don't see Adobe doing that. But, again, is there anything that says they can't? What seems like a deal now, could in theory get expensive quickly. That's the main problem I have with it. Hopefully they won't pull the tactic used by some of these web hosting companies that get you in at a low rate and then double or triple that rate upon renewal.

    Also, I would like to see Adobe and others address the concerns about invasive tools/apps that bog down your machine and who knows what else.

    So, again, the $56/month is reasonable for what you get from Adobe. But imagine a world where every piece of software you have is on subscription and there's no limit to how much they can raise it. Suddenly you could be over your head in subscription fees and held hostage if the software stops working once you stop paying. Let's hope it doesn't come down to that.
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  5. #15  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    Adobe lacks a front man these days to do it, a couple key people who used to be a bit of that voice have since moved on.

    But a sincere and honest face who can come out and explain that $$ a month and $$$ a year allows them to continue developing and adding state of the art features to all of their software packages is the core effort behind the subscription model which leads to features like Motion Content Aware Fill (which is really a wonderful tool) is what's going on.

    The other real big issue Adobe has faced over the years is Piracy, still to this day. Subscription allows for a moderate fight against that potential lost revenue, but it's still a problem for anybody making software.

    And back to my sort of sudo-starting point here, for many professionals we are passively paying because we like, need, or want to work within this ecosystem. Giving people a handsome discount for the first year percentage-wise for new costumers is an obvious way to drum up business, but for long time customers it's pretty easy to look at that and say "wow, those people get 56% off" and we're sort of left in a corner where they value potential new costumers over an established loyal user base.

    This is something RED does well with the upgrade program/mentality and for those who have been on that ride it typically results in notable savings over purchasing a brand new system. I've now spoken to a handful of people who are currently "on fire" about not having something similar for those chosen brand/camera at the moment. In that way it's not a buy once, cry once situation. But rather a cry once, buy once, cry again, sell, and likely enjoy a third cry to move on.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Michael Hastings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Holland View Post

    But a sincere and honest face who can come out and explain that $$ a month and $$$ a year allows them to continue developing and adding state of the art features to all of their software packages is the core effort behind the subscription model which leads to features like Motion Content Aware Fill (which is really a wonderful tool) is what's going on.
    I voted for the Apple/BMD model because there wasn't an option for Buy it-own it without free updates. Free updates are great but probably not sustainable in the long run - mainly works while you are rapidly developing the software and generating new sales - but once things settle there will be a need for additional revenue to support development.

    The subscription model is fine when you are regularly using the programs but it is very frustrating when you aren't but may have old documents that you still want to open.

    Back in the day, when print was king and we had to create numerous new brochures and ads every few months, I was quite proficient in QuarkXpress and was so used to using it that I even wrote letters and such in it (where WORD would have been fine) as well as articles and guides that are still relevant today. When the internet came along and apple went intel I kind of abandoned it as I wasn't using it as often (and for a while the free/cheap version of Indesign opened the Quark files.) Eventually that broke down and a few years ago I paid a few hundred to upgrade just to get some old documents - and I actually really enjoyed it - it was like playing your favorite guitar - all of the keystrokes and shortcuts for kerning, leading, alignment, picture sizing etc. were automatic for me. But another version or two and it was broken again with new apple OS versions, so another $300 to get it working again, but I just can't justify that kind of money in the future for the amount of use.

    I also have hundreds of design drawings that I would do in Illustrator since most of our manufacturing items are 2d-ish, but even there I don't need it that often. I'm using an old CS6 version but I figure that will get busted by the OS sometime in the not too distant future.

    To make a long story shorter, I kind of prefer the old model - buy it, own it with reasonable priced upgrades that you can put off either until it breaks due to OS or new features are worth it. I suspect that will be where we are with Resolve in a couple years and that's fine as long as it's in line with the purchase price - ie something like $50-$100 per upgrade. I would guess the upgrades would still happen every year but probably the previous version would still work so a not-so-hardcore user could skip a year or two.
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member Jaime Vallés's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Sherrick View Post
    So, again, the $56/month is reasonable for what you get from Adobe. But imagine a world where every piece of software you have is on subscription and there's no limit to how much they can raise it. Suddenly you could be over your head in subscription fees and held hostage if the software stops working once you stop paying. Let's hope it doesn't come down to that.
    That's definitely a concern, but then again I live in a rented apartment in New York City (which is in essence a kind of subscription) and I don't own a car, relying instead on public transportation / taxis / Uber (which is another type of subscription) so I'm used to everything costing more over time.

    Currently, my answer to Adobe raising their rates is that I charge more for gigs. :)
    Jaime Vallés

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  8. #18  
    Senior Member Steve Sherrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Hastings View Post
    I voted for the Apple/BMD model because there wasn't an option for Buy it-own it without free updates. Free updates are great but probably not sustainable in the long run - mainly works while you are rapidly developing the software and generating new sales - but once things settle there will be a need for additional revenue to support development.
    There is a poll option for that- Perpetual with yearly support fees. Avid for example. I pay $285 year for support plan. If I stop paying that I still own it but I have to stay at the last ersion that fell under that support plan. Avid also offers Subscription for those that want to go that route.
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  9. #19  
    Senior Member mikeburton's Avatar
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    I think the Adobe subscription model is a relative bargain for the amount of tools that I use daily. I guess I don’t worry about the prices going drastically up because if it did there would be other options I could easily migrate to ie Resolve, Avid and FCPx. I’d export XML’s for my old projects and be done. That said, it may not be for everyone. I’m happy with it and know that I always have a choice. Their tools help me produce 3-5 videos a week and it’s such a small cost of doing business it doesn’t make sense to not have it. Oh, and it’s a tax write off so...
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  10. #20  
    Senior Member PatrickFaith's Avatar
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    I prefer blackmagic's approach, Adobe is ok but way to expensive for most uses. Autdesk and nuke pricing has just gone insane, I have worked with autodesk to get some good deals but all the "kids" I know are going blender and unity. I am going 80% open source in general, but keeping up with versions and stuff is death. So far I like at least the direction avid is going, but the jury is not out on that. Apple is btw driving me crazy, I like apples pricing generally, but basically having no high end machines and completely ditching the server market is forcing me to drop everything apple (I guess that's the buy initial free updates, which I like, but their hw strategy is so horrible I am dropping apple).
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