Thread: Clearing up my confusion with MX latitude

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  1. #1 Clearing up my confusion with MX latitude 
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    I've gone through the entirety of the Epic forums (yes, it took 4 months) but I'm still finding myself second guessing my knowledge and also I think making up information I think I might have read.

    I remember reading something about the MX sensor. To properly expose highlights and shadows in range with no clipping you should only go over middle grey 5.5 stops for highlights and 3 or so stops under for shadows? It was so long ago I should have saved the specific thread. Basically trying to figure out "safe" latitude instead of it's overall dynamic range.

    Does this sound right? I'm experimenting with the Epic now and I've found myself dramatically overexposing skin tones and highlights. Trying to clear things up in my knowledge so I can do more mathematically correct exposures with my meter.

    Appreciate the help!
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  2. #2  
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    I think you are way over thinking this.

    Set ASA to whats appropriate for what you are shooting. (I shot plenty of stuff at 500 asa and higher, don't be afraid of higher asas)

    If you really don't want anything to clip (keep in mind some shit can clip, screaming highlighhts, a bright window in the BG, don't underexpose your subject by two stops so that you keep from cliping white window shears in a room in the BG), expose with histogram so you aren't clipping anything important, and call it a day.

    Nick
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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Gardner View Post
    I think you are way over thinking this.

    Set ASA to whats appropriate for what you are shooting. (I shot plenty of stuff at 500 asa and higher, don't be afraid of higher asas)

    If you really don't want anything to clip (keep in mind some shit can clip, screaming highlighhts, a bright window in the BG, don't underexpose your subject by two stops so that you keep from cliping white window shears in a room in the BG), expose with histogram so you aren't clipping anything important, and call it a day.

    Nick
    Appreciate this Nick.
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  4. #4  
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    Ideally you'd get a grey-card, white-card, colour-chart, and skin-tone model and shoot them all in the same frame/scene under controlled lighting.

    That way you can vary your exposures in a methodical way up and down (preferably with the lights or shutter speed and not the lens stops/aperture) to determine for yourself what your acceptable latitude range is.

    This will also give yourself footage that you can take into post to see how far you can push and pull back to normal an improperly exposed image.

    At the same time you can see where your preferred exposure is on the camera's histogram (and other exposure tools) and calibrate your light meter to values that match your preferred in-camera (and lens) settings (the actual numbers might not be the same).

    Doing that will also show you why you can't just rely on what you see on your monitor when shooting.


    In other words, the numbers and settings you're looking for are the ones you have to find and determine for yourself, by shooting a range of values that you can directly compare and choose from. Not that you'll always be able to use those preferred values and settings under non-test conditions, but at least you'll then know when it's happening and what results to expect.
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  5. #5  
    Les Hillis is right. It is never a waste of time to shoot a card, either at the beginning or end of each shot, the beginning or the end of each day--whatever you can manage.
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
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  6. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les Hillis View Post
    Ideally you'd get a grey-card, white-card, colour-chart, and skin-tone model and shoot them all in the same frame/scene under controlled lighting.

    That way you can vary your exposures in a methodical way up and down (preferably with the lights or shutter speed and not the lens stops/aperture) to determine for yourself what your acceptable latitude range is.

    This will also give yourself footage that you can take into post to see how far you can push and pull back to normal an improperly exposed image.

    At the same time you can see where your preferred exposure is on the camera's histogram (and other exposure tools) and calibrate your light meter to values that match your preferred in-camera (and lens) settings (the actual numbers might not be the same).

    Doing that will also show you why you can't just rely on what you see on your monitor when shooting.


    In other words, the numbers and settings you're looking for are the ones you have to find and determine for yourself, by shooting a range of values that you can directly compare and choose from. Not that you'll always be able to use those preferred values and settings under non-test conditions, but at least you'll then know when it's happening and what results to expect.
    I own the XRite passport and try to put the grey card at 40 IRE or so whenever possible while getting lighter skin to about 50-60 (I read a few times with RED it's better to keep them under 70). I'll look more into correlating my personal exposure preferences and bringing that in line with my meter. I only have the L308 so can't do any profiles or anything crazy.
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