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  1. #11  
    What monitor brightness setting do you have the screen set to?
    You can adjust the monitor brightness through the monitoring menu.
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member greg filipkowski's Avatar
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    Yes guys Im aware its only monitoring and lowering the monitor intensity does not help.
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member Jacek Zakowicz's Avatar
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    OK The sensor has only one sensitivity. Like film stock. Changing the ISO will not change that. This is the point of RAW cameras. They are in this regard like film cameras and the sensor is the film stock. Your Gemini sensor is always ISO 640/800 whatever it is no matter where you set the ISO in camera. It is always only meta data. Lower your ISO to where you like the image , expose for whatever the base ISO is (800?) Done!!!
    You push to 6400 in post- that's how it's done...
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member greg filipkowski's Avatar
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    2+2=4
    yeas but when its really dark, and its a run and gun situtation you have to push it to see the image, this is strictly monitoring issue. I know what raw is and how it works.
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  5. #15  
    Senior Member Jacek Zakowicz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greg filipkowski View Post
    2+2=4
    yeas but when its really dark, and its a run and gun situtation you have to push it to see the image, this is strictly monitoring issue. I know what raw is and how it works.
    Yes and the image is clearly over exposed at 6400 at least for the REC709. Lower the ISO until you like it and shoot. What is the problem here?
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member greg filipkowski's Avatar
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    When you look at the scopes its not over exposed
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  7. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacek Zakowicz View Post
    Why don't you just lower the ISO, the camera captures the same no matter what ISO you use-it's a RAW camera...
    And also it sets the meta data. Can be changed later of course but I think what Greg means is that if the histogram looks like it does then image should not be so blown out on the touch screen.
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  8. #18  
    Senior Member Jacek Zakowicz's Avatar
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    Ok. If he is properly exposing the sensor iso800 and has the histogram set to raw view but cranked up monitoring to iso 6400 then yes it will be over exposed on monitor.
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  9. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacek Zakowicz View Post
    Ok. If he is properly exposing the sensor iso800 and has the histogram set to raw view but cranked up monitoring to iso 6400 then yes it will be over exposed on monitor.
    Histogram set to "raw view" how do you do that? The histogram follows whats on the screen i.e luts, curves, iso etc applied, only the goal posts and stoplights follows raw, no?

    So basically from looking at the histogram of his screen image looks to have proper exposure, nothing burning. The image on the other hand is burnt out. I think thats what he's stating atleast if I did not miss something.
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  10. #20  
    Senior Member Jacek Zakowicz's Avatar
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    I'm sorry I thought you can have the histogram set to raw, i.e. true sensor reading. If not then what is it for? That could lead to massive exposure errors. Why have scopes showing incorrect data?
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