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  1. #1 Puget Systems PCs 
    So I was originally looking at getting an iMac Pro but the build I was looking at getting was going to cost me close to 10K. And I felt really dirty spending that much money on an Apple product when I can get a comparable (or better) PC for half the price. I noticed a bunch of people recommending Puget Systems in another thread, and they have some good looking set ups that they recommend for specific purposes, such as Resolve, Premiere, R3D etc.

    I was considering getting their Adobe Premiere build (with a few tweaks to the configuration), but I noticed they have a separate build they recommend for R3Ds, but with no Thunderbolt support. I'm not sure if Thunderbolt support matters to me that much....but I also currently use Premiere and After Effects mostly. A lot of the work I do is with R3Ds, but I'm going to be working more and more with Alexa and Black Magic footage in the future as well (a lot of Pro Res), so I'm wondering if I should bother with the R3D build, or just go with their Adobe Premiere build. Any thoughts?


    Recommended Systems for Adobe Premiere Pro CC


    R3D optimized for Premiere
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  2. #2  
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    When you can try to delay your hardware puchase at least till CES (jan 8..12, 2019), there is a lot of new, fast and cheap hardware coming.
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member Simon Dunne's Avatar
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    If you're UK based, check out Strong Box....

    https://www.strongboxtechnology.com/
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Shaeden Gallegos's Avatar
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    Puget is awesome! Great Support and Customer Service. Several friends have bought their custom systems from Puget :)
    You don't have to see something to believe in it, but you have to believe in something to see it.
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    Senior Member Andy_Johnson's Avatar
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    If you follow Linus Tech Tips - he had a great video walk-through of their facility and also their PCs here:


    Those two systems you posted are very different. Personally I would stick with Intel right off the bat. The i9 is a beast compared to even AMD's best Threadripper.
    Secondly, the RTX 2070 is a much better choice since you get added benefits of the new Turing architecture like Ray tracing.
    Lastly the i9 system comes with 64GB of RAM. I'm not sure if you'd take full advantage of that but the more the merrier. I wouldn't focus so much on what a system if optimized for (i.e. Premiere or R3D) but rather the hardware itself. CPU, GPU, RAM, being at the top of the concern list. Your disk array also matters depending on your work but this can also be handled by an external solution so you don't have to worry about internal RAIDs/etc.

    I guess it boils down to your budget - what are you looking for roughly?
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  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy_Johnson View Post
    If you follow Linus Tech Tips - he had a great video walk-through of their facility and also their PCs here:

    Those two systems you posted are very different. Personally I would stick with Intel right off the bat. The i9 is a beast compared to even AMD's best Threadripper.
    Secondly, the RTX 2070 is a much better choice since you get added benefits of the new Turing architecture like Ray tracing.
    Lastly the i9 system comes with 64GB of RAM. I'm not sure if you'd take full advantage of that but the more the merrier. I wouldn't focus so much on what a system if optimized for (i.e. Premiere or R3D) but rather the hardware itself. CPU, GPU, RAM, being at the top of the concern list. Your disk array also matters depending on your work but this can also be handled by an external solution so you don't have to worry about internal RAIDs/etc.

    I guess it boils down to your budget - what are you looking for roughly?

    So I realized Puget Systems doesn't ship to Canada, and I'm located in Vancouver Canada. I could always ship it to Washington and go pick it up, but I would also have to pay a lot in taxes etc. So I'm thinking of just getting a similarly built PC in Canada to save some money and headache.

    But I am still wondering a few things about some of the specs. I'm hoping to not spend more than $6000 Canadian. I found a company in Toronto that seems to build pretty good PCs.

    The build I'm looking at there looks like this:

    64 GB Memory
    GTX 1060 6GB graphics card
    i9-7920X 12-Core/24 Thread
    Motherboard: Asus TUF X299 2066 pin, 8 memory slots,128GB max
    Storage: 1TB NVMe Super Fast PCI-E SSD Drive
    Additional 2 TB HDD
    Fractal Design C Compact Mid tower Case
    EVGA 750W power supply

    Total with tax & shipping: $6100

    I'm wondering if it's worth getting the 12-core, because I would save almost $1500 going with the 8 Core...and then I could get the RTX 2080 GB graphics card and my total would be like $5000. Is the 8 core going to be much different than the 12 core? Would it be better to spend more on the 12 core or more on the RTX 2080 graphics card? I'm doing a lot of editing in Premiere, with some compositing done in After Effects. I work with 8K R3Ds pretty frequently, but I'm currently transcoding them. I'm currently working on a 2013 iMac with 3.5 GHz Intel Core i7, 32 GB of ram, and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780m 4096 MB. So I'm used to things not being lightning fast. I don't know if I need the absolute fastest PC out there.
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    Senior Member Andy_Johnson's Avatar
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    I would definitely go with an RTX card at this point. Especially with the demos that Jarred has given recently - most of the real time debayering is being moved to the GPU instead of the CPU. So CPU cores still help, but the GPU is becoming crucial. I can't speak to how Premiere and AE will take advantage of the new RTX cards but it certainly doesn't hurt in the long run - especially since the 1060 is already outperformed by a big margin by them. Personally, an 8 core (16 Hyper threaded cores assuming you are talking about the i9-9900K) is plenty of horsepower if you want to save some cash.
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by David McDonald View Post

    I'm hoping to not spend more than $6000 Canadian.
    When that really is the case, wait for the CES 2019 announcments.
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  9. #9  
    I operate a Puget system in an office with some maxed out iMac Pro systems & other custom PCs and I've run extensive performance testing in different applications so I have some anecdotal recommendations:

    Puget: 14C i9, 128GB, 2x1080 Ti, NVMe everything
    iMac Pro: 14C Xeon, 128GB, Vega 64 FE, NVMe everything
    Custom PC: 14C i9, 128GB, 2080 Ti, NVMe everything

    1.) Puget builds excellent machines and has excellent customer service. You can build machines with similar performance at much cheaper costs (and I do this as well), but if you're okay with a ~30% price premium you will get a great product that they will support no-questions-asked, to a degree that was frankly surprising in my experience. Also, spring for the sound conditioning option. It is very impressive how quietly our Puget system runs and it's the only feature they offer that I can't quite replicate to the same level on my own builds.

    2.) Cost comparison with the iMac Pro is interesting: our ~$8K Puget machine outperforms the $11K iMac Pro in Resolve by a significant margin in most operations, but doesn't show any benefit in Premiere or AE. It's really down to Adobe's hardware support which is largely out of date in all but the most recent GPU accelerated effects. More cores & more GPUs don't seem to matter to Adobe beyond a modest level in all but specialized applications like R3D playback (which obviously is important here).

    3.) Related to the above, RTX cards are potentially interesting depending on what features of the new hardware will be implemented -- and, significantly, how soon they are implemented. Adobe is not on the cutting edge of hardware support and other than forthcoming R3D optimizations (from Nvidia / RED, not Adobe) it could be years before RTX-specific benefits show up, at which point the price / SKU landscape could be very different.

    4.) In comparison to last-gen performance RTX is a toss-up, at a significant price premium. My custom 2080 Ti system shows no performance spread in Adobe, and in Resolve some interesting trades back and forth with the iMac Pro / Puget system. The single 2080 Ti is faster than the 2x 1080 Ti in some operations, much slower in others.

    5.) One big point leaning in favor of the >=2080 vs. the <=2070 is the additional VRAM, which will become a limiting factor in >1080p work if you're running lots of processing through the GPU (Resolve). May not be an issue in Adobe environment where the GPU is less useful, I haven't done any 4K work in Adobe.

    6.) I use all 128GB of RAM in my systems. More cores & more RAM will benefit AE / Fusion / Nuke but not really Premiere or Resolve. The exception to that rule is R3D decompression which does benefit from more cores (not more memory) -- and is why the Threadrippers are actually excellent choices for R3Ds. We only work with Intel because we need Thunderbolt but I would not hesitate to go with a Threadripper otherwise, especially for multi-GPU setups.

    7.) All in all, anything you buy in this price range is going to feel like a huge improvement over a 2013 iMac.
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedidiah Mitchell View Post
    All in all, anything you buy in this price range is going to feel like a huge improvement over a 2013 iMac.
    Or a 2013 Mac Pro.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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