Thread: The Social Network Cinematography (Need Advice)

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  1. #1 The Social Network Cinematography (Need Advice) 
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    Hi guys,


    I'm fairly new to owning a Red, I picked up a R1MX back in September and have been loving every second of this camera. Even if it's considered an old in the cinema world I actually prefer the look of the R1 over some of the newer sensors.

    I'm a huge fan of Jeff Cronenweth and David Fincher. I'm about to invest in some Quasar tubes and I need a little help. The Quasars are offered in tungsten or daylight... Just like Kino's

    I need a little help on weather to pick the tungsten's or daylights. I will mostly be shooting interior night style scenes. If I went with daylight Quasars I could of course CTO them but at the cost of losing a stop or 2 and visa versa the other way around if I picked up the tungsten's I could gel them with CTB.

    I not sure if anybody here that has worked on the set of TSN could maybe give a little insight on what was used? I attached a few pictures of some BTS and also a few shot's I tried myself to try to match the look using basic tungsten par cans and bouncing light on my R1MX

    What do you guys think... these look like tungsten or daylight kinos?
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  2. #2  
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    I would buy the Switch or Crossfade Quasars if I was gonna invest. I have a couple of 4’ switch tubes from Quasar Science and love them. They cost a bit more than the T8 or whatevere they are called, but they also have more output i belive i have read somewhere.
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  3. #3  
    Not sure if you read these already.

    From ASC: https://theasc.com/ac_magazine/Octob...ork/page1.html

    “Much of it was practicals and simple lights, basic Fresnel and Kino Flo fixtures,” says gaffer Harold Skinner. “We also used Lightcraft 4-foot 2Ks and soft-light rigs I call ‘covered wagons,’ which are basically lamps in a 4-foot cylinder with protective grids approximately 12 inches in diameter. Inside each are common globes, 75-watt PH211s, 250-watt ECAs, 500-watt ECTs, and so on. We also used little clip-on lights that we called ‘budget busters.’”

    From Variety: http://variety.com/2011/film/awards/...rk-1118031675/

    ” The film, he says, set out to capture “the dark claustrophobia and isolation of old college dormitories, which in turn reined in the color palette. We wanted to get a dark look, and when it was possible and unforced, we used as much contrast and sense of mystery as we could in key scenes. So dark wood, dark brick buildings, small, dark dorm rooms — all these elements informed the look and feel David and I went for, a sort of hyper-reality that heightens normal tones and perceptions.”

    From BSC: https://britishcinematographer.co.uk...ocial-network/

    “The moral compass of the story is murky and grey, and the ethics don't play out with any sense of certainty about the right answers,” says Cronenweth, “so we needed to match this with the visual tones and still have something exciting to look at. We decided to mute the colour pallete quite heavily in the college scenes, and keep a limited depth-of-field to make the place feel claustrophobic in contrast to San Francisco.”
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  4. #4  
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    That's a bunch of great information. It's what I really love about this forum and the people on here, Thank you!

    @Jørgen I too read about the crossfades but unfortunately they're out of my budget right now. $275 is a great price for one tube but I can get almost 4 fixed tungsten or daylight tubes for the same price as one crossfade. I'll eventually go that route, but for now I think I'll be able to get more done with the cheaper tubes.

    That just leads me to my toughest choice on weather to buy the 3200k tubes or the 5600k.

    I'm guessing they were using tungsten balanced kinos for TSN mostly if they also had practicals in the mix with PH211's etc...
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Daniel Stilling's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Rash View Post
    That just leads me to my toughest choice on weather to buy the 3200k tubes or the 5600k.
    If you don't know exactly what you will be shooting, it's impossible to limit yourself by one single color temp. Sometimes you need one, sometimes the other and sometimes a mix. The beauty of Quasars is the option of changing the color temp without having to switch out the tubes, like you had to on Kinos. In your case, you are better of buying Kino fixtures and both color temp lamps, since the Kino bulbs are much cheaper and used kino fixtures can be had for a song these days...
    Daniel Stilling, DFF (Danish Society of Cinematographers)
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member D Fuller's Avatar
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    On a technical note, the sensor in your R1 craves blue light. So fi you go tungsten, know that you need to ensure that there is enough light to keep you out of the noise floor. The lack of blue light will tend to make the image noisier, all things being equal (which, of course, they never are.).
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  7. #7  
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    Hi Daniel,

    Thanks for the input! I agree on being limited to a specific color temp. That's why I was going to use CTB or CTO for the time being until I can afford more tubes and other lights for my kit... I was just thinking in terms of what would be the best to start with just so I can start playing with some light. I really do love the Quasar's because they're lightweight and can be mounted pretty much anywhere. Also for the most part prefer soft light. I'm mainly going to be doing night interior type lighting.
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Fuller View Post
    On a technical note, the sensor in your R1 craves blue light. So fi you go tungsten, know that you need to ensure that there is enough light to keep you out of the noise floor. The lack of blue light will tend to make the image noisier, all things being equal (which, of course, they never are.).

    Oddly enough I usually see more noise in the blue sky and dark green areas like under exposed trees etc... I have never had any issues with tungsten lighting, even in very very low light. I did a test last week under a sodium vapor light at night and there was no noise. The MX sensor is still a mighty good looking chip, even in extreme conditions. I have read a lot about it needing blue light though.
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  9. #9  
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    The whole blue light thing is mostly a myth. I shot more than one feature on red one with all tungsten lighting. This was back when the pixel nerds were screaming that you needed to shoot daylight only or you would burst into flames, speak in tongues, and school buses full of children would die if you shot tungsten. Crock of shit.

    Nick
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  10. #10  
    Senior Member Patrick Tresch's Avatar
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    Well, the MX is happy with >5000 kelvin but you can shoot 3200 kelvin without noise if you don't white balance at that temp (keep it orange).
    BUT if you white balance 3200 light you'll push your blue channel by about 1 1/3 stops and therefore pump up the noise in that channel. So for example 800 iso will give you about 2000 iso noise in the blue channel after color balancing.
    Therefore it wasn't advised to light blue screen with tungsten or 3200 kelvin light.

    Pat
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