Click here to go to the first RED TEAM post in this thread.   Thread: RED TECH Low Light

Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 39 of 39
  1. #31  
    Senior Member Ben Scott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    3,052
    Quote Originally Posted by Björn Benckert View Post
    In my mind shooting low iso or shutting down to create a dark shot even though it´s not is normally not called lowlight. Its called low key or day for night. Low light... is more commonly used when you shoot with low exposure and dont have coverage in the whole frame.
    Low key refers to the contrast ratios in your image, not the exposure.
    ----------------------------------------------------------


    2017 Reel

    Website
    Twitter
    Instagram
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #32  
    Senior Member Ben Scott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    3,052
    Quote Originally Posted by Rui Guerra View Post
    It would be nice that RED Tech had more complete and structured tutorial videos about different subjects.
    My point is, like in this example about Low Light shooting, where several aspects are missing, a well planned video, will avoid that. Including all the steps / stages from equipment (for example OLPF choice, lenses, etc), production (camera settings) and post-production (adjustment in RCX and NR if needed) will certainly be very welcome.

    We all know that every choice is a trade-off and there are no miracles. But since we don't have a RED Shooting Guide or at least an User Manual that teaches users when and how to use all the camera functions, RED Tech videos will be a very good opportunity to do so, and not to just outline in a general way some of the cameras functionalities (that were already mentioned in other videos and in the RED website).
    The thing is, if you're buying into a professional cinema camera ecosystem, or renting into one, there is an expectation that you are professional that understands the basics of how to expose a scene. This information is completely camera agnostic.

    So they make really useful videos that talk about the idiosyncrasies of their ecosystem that people might not be familiar with.

    There is always the Field Ops guide if you need more hand holding than this.
    ----------------------------------------------------------


    2017 Reel

    Website
    Twitter
    Instagram
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Scott View Post
    The thing is, if you're buying into a professional cinema camera ecosystem, or renting into one, there is an expectation that you are professional that understands the basics of how to expose a scene. This information is completely camera agnostic.

    So they make really useful videos that talk about the idiosyncrasies of their ecosystem that people might not be familiar with.

    There is always the Field Ops guide if you need more hand holding than this.
    +1000
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #34  
    Senior Member Rui Guerra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Scott View Post
    The thing is, if you're buying into a professional cinema camera ecosystem, or renting into one, there is an expectation that you are professional that understands the basics of how to expose a scene. This information is completely camera agnostic.

    So they make really useful videos that talk about the idiosyncrasies of their ecosystem that people might not be familiar with.

    There is always the Field Ops guide if you need more hand holding than this.
    Understanding the basics of how exposing well is one thing, knowing every little detail in every camera is another. Yes, it's the idiosyncrasies of RED cameras that are useful to understand and should be explained. As you know, during the evolution of camera systems, features are added and removed in a regular basis... and not all of us use them all every day. Also, we all have the preferred settings or the preferred tools we use most often, so it is always good to have other points of view, namely from the ones that develop the hardware / firmware / software of the RED ecosystem.
    Rui Guerra - PHOTOGUERRA Underwater Productions, Lda.
    www.photoguerra.net
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #35  
    Senior Member Marcus Friedlander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    970
    Quote Originally Posted by Rui Guerra View Post
    Understanding the basics of how exposing well is one thing, knowing every little detail in every camera is another. Yes, it's the idiosyncrasies of RED cameras that are useful to understand and should be explained. As you know, during the evolution of camera systems, features are added and removed in a regular basis... and not all of us use them all every day. Also, we all have the preferred settings or the preferred tools we use most often, so it is always good to have other points of view, namely from the ones that develop the hardware / firmware / software of the RED ecosystem.
    This is a pretty good place to start.

    http://www.red.com/learn
    Cheers,

    Marcus Ian Friedlander





    RED EPIC DRAGON #03179 "Squillium the Dragon"


    "Perfection is the goal, excellence is the standard."
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #36  
    Senior Member Audy Erel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Jakarta-Bandung, Indonesia (Bali)
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Rui Guerra View Post
    Hi Audy,

    Can you elaborate a bit about the way you use GioScope in documentary shooting, to avoid clipping and see the shadow texture?
    Thanks
    Hi Rui,

    I turned up all the colors on the GioScope mode (all 16 of them) to see what the sensor actually sees and I always avoid the red colored zone (zone 16) and the blueish zone whenever possible (zone number 8 and below are when the 'image texture' started to become apparent on my Scarlet-W). So I keep most of it all greenish and below dark red to get the best clean images out of this camera. I assign a dedicated GioScope button for quick raw exposure checking before hitting the record button, I rarely use the other exposure tool as this one is so reliable (with REDCode raw recording) and I always adjust the ISO in post.

    When I get all blue zoned as in low light situation and there is no way to add more light I don't have any other choice but to face the noise (as long as they are not purple, or no light at all!)..
    Then 'Neat Video Noise Reducer plugin' is my other friend :)

    I agree with you that this video should add something about the Low Light OLPF.
    SCARLET-W #004760
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #37  
    Senior Member Rui Guerra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by Audy Erel View Post
    Hi Rui,

    I turned up all the colors on the GioScope mode (all 16 of them) to see what the sensor actually sees and I always avoid the red colored zone (zone 16) and the blueish zone whenever possible (zone number 8 and below are when the 'image texture' started to become apparent on my Scarlet-W). So I keep most of it all greenish and below dark red to get the best clean images out of this camera. I assign a dedicated GioScope button for quick raw exposure checking before hitting the record button, I rarely use the other exposure tool as this one is so reliable (with REDCode raw recording)...

    (...)

    When I get all blue zoned as in low light situation and there is no way to add more light I don't have any other choice but to face the noise (as long as they are not purple, or no light at all!)..
    Then 'Neat Video Noise Reducer plugin' is my other friend :)

    I agree with you that this video should add something about the Low Light OLPF.
    Hi Audy,

    Thanks for posting your way to use the camera's tools in a practical way. That's the kind of post that is indeed useful to others and it's after all one of the main reasons to be in Reduser: to exchange valuable information and our own experience while shooting RED.


    and I always adjust the ISO in post
    That is interesting because the ISO we choose at the moment of shooting will influence the aperture/shutter speed and lighting that we use on set. I also tend to play a bit with ISO in post and in fact, especially if we use the RAW view in the viewfinder/monitor's camera, where the ISO is disable, the tendency will be to forget it and leave it's adjustment to post.
    Rui Guerra - PHOTOGUERRA Underwater Productions, Lda.
    www.photoguerra.net
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #38  
    i have to bring that question up again..


    Quote Originally Posted by Heinrich_Lindmayr View Post
    so at around 40 seconds he says that the exposure tools don't change when you change for example ISO.. doesn't he?
    when i change ISO every exposure tool adapts... (no, not shooting prores).. only when i have raw overlayed it sticks - but that is clear cause i can't change the ISO from 800 anyway..

    where is the mistake?? is it my misunderstanding of what he's saying or do i have settings wrong or just a camera error??
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #39  
    Senior Member Rui Guerra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinrich_Lindmayr View Post
    i have to bring that question up again..
    Hi Heinrich,

    For example, when you change ISO, if you take a close look at the left goal post (noise) it will no change because that is a RAW tool and ISO it's just metadata (that's why the histogram changes to the right, because this is video - IRE based tool - in other words, just like a "look" in your monitor and not a light quantity change).
    Rui Guerra - PHOTOGUERRA Underwater Productions, Lda.
    www.photoguerra.net
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts