Thread: Lens set for Epic-W

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  1. #11  
    Senior Member Curtis boggs's Avatar
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    What I'm doing is using the Sigma line for a few reasons.
    #1 GREAT value
    #2 VERY sharp and I can use soft filters etc to get whatever look I want.
    #3 and a big one to me is the 18-35 I have both the cine and still versions and make
    for great versatility. Cine when I need it and smaller/lighter still versions for run & Gun.

    So I can have cine and lighter still glass that matches.

    My "art" lenses are Leica-R's that I am TOTALLY in love with.

    Curtis
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    Curtis Boggs
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    Cinematographer-DP-Colorist
    Epic-W 8k - G&E
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    Leica-R Cine mod prime set
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member Jacek Zakowicz's Avatar
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    From rentability standpoint I would not get CP2s. The same peeps that want CP2s now will only consider CP3s soon. Such is the market. They want the newest and the greatest. Add the magic brand name to it and no wonder they are renting. Performance is a little different story. I think that the differences are so minor that noone can see them so everyone goes with the safe and noble Zeiss brand. The supplier can say they supplied Zeiss glass, the producers can say it was shot with Zeiss glass, the images look good, everyone is happy.
    Happy end ;-)
    Jacek Zakowicz, Optitek-dot-org, jacek2@optitek.org
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  3. #13  
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    If you dislike CA (and purple fringing), then you should probably avoid the CP.2's and CP.3's, despite the fact they would be the most rentable of your options. I work with the CP.2's quite frequently and didn't actually realize how bad the wide open CA and purple fringing was on those until I did a quick, high contrast 'torture' test to compare them with the SLR Magic APO PL mount lenses I picked up. The SLR Magic's blew the Zeiss away on that front. From what I've heard, the CP.3's have not improved over the CP.2's in this regard. The SLR Magic APO series is almost criminally underrated due to the brandname (this is coming from someone who really isn't into SLR Magic's other lenses). That said, they probably aren't a great option for your needs since rentability is a factor, and these lenses would have almost zero rentability due to the brand. Plus there are only 3 lenses in the family so far.

    Of your list above, I'd probably suggest going with the Sigma Cine primes. Really nice lenses with a crisp modern look. I strongly considered them myself, but the 50mm (which is a focal length I use quite a bit) has way too much focus breathing for my purposes. To see an example of the heavy lens breathing, check out the 6 minute mark of this lens review of the Sigma 50mm Art (which the 50mm Cine shares optics with): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cjAzdrr7OM

    The Sony CineAlta are really nice, but won't have very much rentability, and you would be limited to Super 35.

    Any particular reason you aren't considering the Tokina Vista or Schneider Xenon FF?

    Edit: Scratch the Schneider Xenon FF - they have pretty strong purple fringing at high contrast points which would likely be an issue for you. The Tokina Vista series are definitely worth a look though.
    Last edited by Philip Bowen; 07-28-2017 at 01:02 AM.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member Ulf Krentz's Avatar
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    I absolutely love my SCLs. That said it is an owners set as it will probably not rent out well. They are big and heavy. On the plus side they have a very controlled CA, usable wide open, cover the Helium (they are not FF) and and have a very nice overall rendering, not too clinical. You should be able to spot them for even less money than you linked to. Cheers!
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  5. #15  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJ_Ortiz View Post
    I'm just trying to find some lenses that will resolve 8K...
    well, strictly speaking, any modern and vintage lens outresolves 8K sensor with its ~120lp/mm easily, even wide open.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Ulf Krentz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilya O. View Post
    well, strictly speaking, any modern and vintage lens outresolves 8K sensor with its ~120lp/mm easily, even wide open.
    You may want to check your math with Helium having 8190 px @ 29,9mm. That said vintage glass is looking absolutely stunning with an 8K sensor and 8K still provides a huge quality benefit.
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    Yeah, Ulf, 137 lp/mm is more precise value for Helium sensor resolution.

    But guys, this lp/mm numbers is completely theoretical!!!

    In reality, we'd better keep in mind that modern sensors need at least 3 (not 2 as taken in lp/mm calculations!) pixels to resolve a line pair.

    That means one should divide theoretical lp/mm by 1.5 to know realworld sensor resolution.

    Hence, Helium sensor practically resolves ~91 lp/mm at max, not 137 lp/mm.
    Last edited by Ilya O.; 07-31-2017 at 02:27 AM.
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  8. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilya O. View Post
    Yeah, Ulf, 137 lp/mm is more precise value for Helium sensor resolution.

    But guys, this lp/mm numbers is completely theoretical!!!

    In reality, we'd better keep in mind that modern sensors need at least 3 (not 2 as taken in lp/mm calculations!) pixels to resolve a line pair.

    That means one should divide theoretical lp/mm by 1.5 to know realworld sensor resolution.

    Hence, Helium sensor practically resolves ~91 lp/mm at max, not 137 lp/mm.
    Well, if You zoom in, 200 lp/mm becomes a piece of cake...

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  9. #19  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    yeah, Adis, that is so true:-)
    it's because of higher contrast and percieved resolution as I understand.
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  10. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Bowen View Post
    If you dislike CA (and purple fringing), then you should probably avoid the CP.2's and CP.3's, despite the fact they would be the most rentable of your options. I work with the CP.2's quite frequently and didn't actually realize how bad the wide open CA and purple fringing was on those until I did a quick, high contrast 'torture' test to compare them with the SLR Magic APO PL mount lenses I picked up. The SLR Magic's blew the Zeiss away on that front. From what I've heard, the CP.3's have not improved over the CP.2's in this regard. The SLR Magic APO series is almost criminally underrated due to the brandname (this is coming from someone who really isn't into SLR Magic's other lenses). That said, they probably aren't a great option for your needs since rentability is a factor, and these lenses would have almost zero rentability due to the brand. Plus there are only 3 lenses in the family so far.

    Of your list above, I'd probably suggest going with the Sigma Cine primes. Really nice lenses with a crisp modern look. I strongly considered them myself, but the 50mm (which is a focal length I use quite a bit) has way too much focus breathing for my purposes. To see an example of the heavy lens breathing, check out the 6 minute mark of this lens review of the Sigma 50mm Art (which the 50mm Cine shares optics with): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cjAzdrr7OM

    The Sony CineAlta are really nice, but won't have very much rentability, and you would be limited to Super 35.

    Any particular reason you aren't considering the Tokina Vista or Schneider Xenon FF?

    Edit: Scratch the Schneider Xenon FF - they have pretty strong purple fringing at high contrast points which would likely be an issue for you. The Tokina Vista series are definitely worth a look though.
    Just a note, the cine versions do share optical designs but different mechanics. The 50mm Cine barely breathes at all compared to the 50mm Art.

    LensProToGo's test:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkSjj3EQQ9g
    RED Weapon
    @chrisniswongerdp | @justcause.film
    JUSTCAUSE automotive films
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