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  1. #1 Audio mixers at editing stations 
    Senior Member Linda Barzini's Avatar
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    I remember seeing audio mixers at each editing station at some post production facilities. What were they used for? Isn't audio generally delivered by CF, SD, or other digital delivery?
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    Senior Member Andrew Gentle's Avatar
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    Hi Linda, after the audio is delivered it still needs mixing. These days, those audio consoles are likely to be control surfaces which can control the software which actually performs the mix, so that the operator can work in a more quick and hands-on way.
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    Senior Member Nick Morrison's Avatar
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    Most editors don't use those boards anymore - except for recording scratch tracks, etc, and for riding levels on the main monitor speakers.
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    Senior Member Steve Sherrick's Avatar
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    If you are talking about an outboard mixer like a small Mackie, these are useful when you have multiple sources of audio you need to monitor through your main speakers. For example, we could listen to the sound coming off a tape deck, or a mic hooked up for doing temp voiceover, etc. And of course monitor the sound coming from the NLE. Just gives you a lot of flexibility for monitoring. At the very least, you want a way to control volume and mute sound altogether. Very dangerous otherwise because you want instant control if a track slams in really hot and you need to turn it down for a moment.

    A control surface that interacts with the NLE is used for setting volume automation and many find a more organic way to mix tracks as opposed to drawing volume automation.
    Steve Sherrick
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    Senior Member Kwan Khan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Morrison View Post
    Most editors don't use those boards anymore - except for recording scratch tracks, etc, and for riding levels on the main monitor speakers.
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    Senior Member Ben Scott's Avatar
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    I used to manage Avid facilities in the late 90s and then worked at ITV's post facilities. Even then the mixers were purely for monitoring purposes in all our suites.
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Scott View Post
    I used to manage Avid facilities in the late 90s and then worked at ITV's post facilities. Even then the mixers were purely for monitoring purposes in all our suites.
    Yes, this is still done in traditional Avid stations in LA today.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  8. #8  
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    Monitoring and or automation for temp mixes.

    If I had the choice I'd use a control surface type mixer as a way to control levels in the temp mix everytime, way faster generally to do a pass with the sliders than mess about with levels on each clip.
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  9. #9  
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    The standard mixer I generally see at most Avid or Premiere editing workstations is the Mackie 1402:



    It's small, cheap (well under $400) and is very simple and easy to operate. I think I've been seeing these in digital edit bays for more than 15 years.

    Those who say they think they'd rather use the on-screen controls don't take into account three things: 1) a physical mixer has better response, at least in making very subtle changes; 2) a mixer like this is extremely cheap; 3) it runs no operating system, needs no updates, and just sits there and works. It's kind of like a hammer: it's designed to do one thing and does it pretty well.

    Bear in mind these are not used for the final mix: it's really just for monitoring and temp mixes.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  10. #10  
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    I use a mixer for monitoring.

    The computer has audio output, and so does the capture card (blackmagic). You also have headphones, and speakers (that might or might not be at reach for the headphones cord).

    So I use a small mixer, so that I can push the fader up/down of the capture card or the internal sound card of the computer without having to mess with settings in the OS. I can kill the master output, and use only headphones if I want to edit with headphones.

    I would not go for a mixer like the Mackie though. Just because it eats too much desk space. Depending on your needs, something as small as a Behringer Xenyx 802 could do the work (I use a similar but older model), and make your life easier, and those go for about fifty bucks.
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