Thread: NEW TO RED? A few things to think about

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  1. #11  
    I will admit that I am one of the many people that is new to RED and red files so I am reading and figuring things out as much as possible before my Raven comes in.

    I can't say that I am totally inexperienced, I have interacted with it for a weekend, when we rented it for a shoot.
    But, that was just the camera, not the files. As we had another guy on as the main editor.

    I learned Blackshading and T/E is important... there is another thread for that.... you do it to reduce Fixed pattern noise (if you don't want banding, you might want to do this every once in a while - this will give you those crystal clear images). T/E shows you red, yellow and green - you want perfection, you stay in the green, you can get away with it when you are in the yellow (some people don't care enough to do blackshading all the time and will tolerate yellow), but dont' ever shoot when your T/E is red, unless you want to go home and be unhappy with your shots. There are 2 types, one is about 1 hour long to do, another is 10-20 min. to do. (Just find those blackshading threads and read up). Just saying, if you are on a tight schedule and your DSMC2 is in the red, or is giving your error messages, you could save an hours worth by doing blackshading overnight.

    Question: Is Redcode, the same as RAW? Because those shoot out r3d files too, no?
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  2. #12  
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    Thank you I look forward to working in the Red Ecosystem let the fun begin.
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member PatrickFaith's Avatar
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    Very nice. I think one of the biggest hurdles/misunderstanding is in camera ordering since its unique in the industry. It's like a custom queue directly connected to the manufacturing process, where people get in line as RED works/researches with industry leaders(Fincher/Cameron/Scott/Jackson/etc ...). Also with this approach there is a slow ramping with early adopters/industry_leaders, where the first cameras come out in the queue slowly but there is normally a production volume bump about 6 months after that(i.e. When RED says something is available, for most people general availability is about 6 months after that).
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member Terry VerHaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kabilen Mullaithilaga View Post
    I will admit that I am one of the many people that is new to RED and red files so I am reading and figuring things out as much as possible before my Raven comes in.

    I can't say that I am totally inexperienced, I have interacted with it for a weekend, when we rented it for a shoot.
    But, that was just the camera, not the files. As we had another guy on as the main editor.

    I learned Blackshading and T/E is important... there is another thread for that.... you do it to reduce Fixed pattern noise (if you don't want banding, you might want to do this every once in a while - this will give you those crystal clear images). T/E shows you red, yellow and green - you want perfection, you stay in the green, you can get away with it when you are in the yellow (some people don't care enough to do blackshading all the time and will tolerate yellow), but dont' ever shoot when your T/E is red, unless you want to go home and be unhappy with your shots. There are 2 types, one is about 1 hour long to do, another is 10-20 min. to do. (Just find those blackshading threads and read up). Just saying, if you are on a tight schedule and your DSMC2 is in the red, or is giving your error messages, you could save an hours worth by doing blackshading overnight.

    Question: Is Redcode, the same as RAW? Because those shoot out r3d files too, no?
    In the world of RED, REDcode does indeed equal raw.

    Sometimes people will say "REDcode can't be raw because it is compressed." This is simply a misunderstanding of the fact that raw has nothing to do with compression; at least the kind of compression employed by RED in it's REDcode. RED records the unaltered signal coming on to the sensor without processing - they have simply designed a proprietary process of compressing that signal which allows the recorded signal to be smaller with no or minimal loss to it's fidelity. RED is mathematically lossless at about 2.5:1 compression and "visually lossless," which is, of course, somewhat subjective, at (if I remember correctly) somewhere around 5 or 6:1. That number is subject to variation both over time, as the science is tweaked, and based on what kind of footage you might be shooting.

    As an aside, I see the word "RAW" written in all uppercase letter a lot as if it were an acronym. It's not, it's just a word - no mysterious underlying meaning - and can be spelled "raw." :-)
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  5. #15  
    Great idea David. For those of us who've been on since the beginning it can be easy to forget that getting into the world of RAW can be a bit of a leap.

    I think the biggest jump for those coming into this world is a change in psychology. You have to treat the RAW image more like a film neg. You want a rich, thick negative capturing as much as possible, with the intent to tweak it later. So even if you want you shadows to be crushed or highlights to blow to white, it's better to capture those details during image capture and adjust later. The nice thing about the higher-end DSMC2 bodies (and the RAW workflow in general) is you can apply a LUT (Weapon+) or an RMD look (all Red's) to tweak the image, while retaining the maximum amount of detail in the RAW.

    Another thing worth mentioning is the difference in resolution between a Bayer sensor and other formats. Raven at 4.5K will garner about 3.6-3.8K of total resolution—less than the total pixel count but higher than many other Bayer sensors thanks to Graeme's debayer magic. This has to do with individual pixels only sampling one of Red, Green (2x) or Blue and then being combined via bayesian transform to full RGB values for each pixel.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Brent G Miller Jr's Avatar
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    As someone who comes from years of shooting on DSLRs, I’m a touch confused when it comes to ISO and shooting RAW. With DSLR filming, ISO is another tool to correctly expose a shot and control noise, so, am I understanding this right that I could shoot a scene on RED at an ISO of 5000 and there would no more noise in the shot, if dropped in post to ISO 400, then if the shot was natively captured on-set at ISO 400?!
    Last edited by Brent G Miller Jr; 05-09-2016 at 10:01 AM.
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  7. #17  
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    Any recommendations (books, articles, videos...etc) that gives a complete baseline on RAW r3d workflow? Coming from FS100 and a7s, I want to understand how to maximize RAW files. Thanks.
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  9. #19  
    Moderator David Battistella's Avatar
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    This of ISO with RED as a way of rating a scene and moving middle grey of that scene up and down. You can stick with ISO XXX when you process or you can move it in post. If you did have the camera at 6400ISO while you were shooting, you are not committed to that ISO when you post process.

    David




    Quote Originally Posted by Brent G Miller Jr View Post
    As someone who comes from years of shooting on DSLRs, I’m a touch confused when it comes to ISO and shooting RAW. With DSLR filming, ISO is another tool to correctly expose a shot and control noise, so, am I understanding this right that I could shoot a scene on RED at an ISO of 5000 and there would no more noise in the shot, if dropped in post to ISO 400, then if the shot was natively captured on-set at ISO 400?!
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  10. #20  
    Moderator David Battistella's Avatar
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    RAW VIEW AND HISTOGRAM ARE YOUR FRIEND


    To me, the second most important thing after looking at your monitor for exposure and composition are the:

    HISTOGRAM, RAW VIEW, GOALPOST and STOPLIGHT TOOLS

    These three tools used together will take you a long long way toward excellent exposure

    HISTOGRAM - Learn how to read one based on your scene,

    RAW VIEW - Understand that with RED this represents whiat the sensor sees at ISO 800 with a DragonColor 2 and REDlogfilm look profile. Swithcing between this and your settings will tell you a lot. Know where the RAW VIEW key is mapped and use it often
    GOAL POSTS above a certain noise. The one on the right tells you how many pixels are clipping

    STOPLIGHTS - This tells you when an R G OR B CHANNEL IS CLIPPING


    Memorize this page of the DSMC manual first.

    David
    Last edited by David Battistella; 05-09-2016 at 12:03 PM.
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