Thread: Ultra Violet dedicated Camera or RED UV OLPF

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  1. #1 Ultra Violet dedicated Camera or RED UV OLPF 
    Hi guys,

    I have a shooting to make using a UV camera. I am in Portugal and I canīt find any UV camera here, not even in Europe. I found this guys http://www.lifepixel.com/shop/ultrav...era-conversion They convert Canon cameras. But it takes about 1 month for all the process.
    I have also found this https://www.astromarket.org/filters-...0d?language=en
    And the local Canon could replace it here in Portugal, but I donīt now if it does the same effect.
    Anyone knows other option? I have a Scarlet Dragon, is there anyway to use it? Red as a IV OLPF, is there any third party UV OLPF?

    Thanks

    Guilherme
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  2. #2  
    My guess is that your best bet would be to use the Full Spectrum Kipper Tie OLPF and then filter everything except UV. I don't know though if the sensor glass also filters UV, it very well may.

    http://kippertie.com/?product=full-s...ter-for-dragon
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  3. #3  
    Thanks Gavin, Iīll try to contact kippertie and ask if they have a solution.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gavin Greenwalt View Post
    My guess is that your best bet would be to use the Full Spectrum Kipper Tie OLPF and then filter everything except UV. I don't know though if the sensor glass also filters UV, it very well may.

    http://kippertie.com/?product=full-s...ter-for-dragon
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Dr. Sassi's Avatar
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    I asked the support a while ago, if and where UV filtration could happen. No final answer so far.



    Note that you need special lenses and of course an UV pass filter for that, but I guess you are aware of that.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraviolet_photography

    Quote from wiki:

    "Most types of glass will allow longwave UV to pass, but absorb all the other UV wavelengths, usually from about 350 nm and below. For UV photography it is necessary to use specially developed lenses having elements made from fused quartz or quartz and fluorite. Lenses based purely on quartz show a distinct focus shift between visible and UV light, whereas the fluorite/quartz lenses can be fully corrected between visible and ultraviolet light without focus shift. Examples of the latter type are the Nikon UV-Nikkor 105 mm f/4.5, the Coastal Optics 60 mm f/4.0, the Hasselblad (Zeiss) UV-Sonnar 105 mm and the Asahi Pentax Ultra Achromatic Takumar 85 mm f/3.5[1]"

    I haven't had a chance so far to check how pure "plastic" lenses would work for that.
    Last edited by Dr. Sassi; 06-01-2015 at 07:35 PM.
    Dr. Sassi V. Sassmannshausen PhD
    Epic Dragon "Grisų".

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  5. #5  
    Thanks Dr. Sassi!

    They also havenīt replied me... Iīm trying other solution in the UK. Letīs see if it works.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Sassi View Post
    I asked the support a while ago, if and where UV filtration could happen. No final answer so far.

    Note that you need special lenses and of course an UV pass filter for that, but I guess you are aware of that.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraviolet_photography

    Quote from wiki:

    "Most types of glass will allow longwave UV to pass, but absorb all the other UV wavelengths, usually from about 350 nm and below. For UV photography it is necessary to use specially developed lenses having elements made from fused quartz or quartz and fluorite. Lenses based purely on quartz show a distinct focus shift between visible and UV light, whereas the fluorite/quartz lenses can be fully corrected between visible and ultraviolet light without focus shift. Examples of the latter type are the Nikon UV-Nikkor 105 mm f/4.5, the Coastal Optics 60 mm f/4.0, the Hasselblad (Zeiss) UV-Sonnar 105 mm and the Asahi Pentax Ultra Achromatic Takumar 85 mm f/3.5[1]"

    I haven't had a chance so far to check how pure "plastic" lenses would work for that.
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  6. #6  
    Senior Member John Marchant's Avatar
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    I'm currently working on this one for some more detail. Experience so far would suggest that UV work of certain kinds is possible. One thing that muddies the water is that most UV bandpass filters also pass a certain amount of IR, and I believe many people may be mistaking one for the other in a final image.

    Production is keeping me busy these last few weeks, but I will have some results to share soon and I'll update our Full Spectrum OLPF product information accordingly.
    KipperTie - Authorised RED Rental, Pinewood Studios, UK
    Ready to hire: Monstro 8K VV | Gemini 5K | Helium Monochrome 8K
    Check out our Revolva ND solution, OLPFs and other products
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  7. #7  
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    The other thing is that silicon sensors just aren't very UV sensitive, so even if you succeed in making an OLPF that passes significant UV, you'll need a tonne of UV light for exposure!
    DOP / Digital Lighting Camera Operator
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    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.
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  8. #8  
    Thanks guys for all the help!
    I managed to get a camera in the UK ready to shoot UV. Letīs see how it goes :)
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member Dr. Sassi's Avatar
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    I got an e-mail from RED about UV. I specified the use of UV based as described in the
    ASC Manual, Edition 10. Page 207-214. "Day-for-Night, Infrared and Ultraviolet Cinematography".

    The fine print of the e-mail tells me that I'm not allowed to share the content of the e-mail.
    Dr. Sassi V. Sassmannshausen PhD
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  10. #10  
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    The more appropriate question to be ask is what is the wavelength that RED sensor can see ? UV-A 400-315 nm ? I dont think this should be a secret.

    R
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