Thread: Davinci resolve verus Scratch

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  1. #1 Davinci resolve verus Scratch 
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    Just wondering if anyone could tell me how great the quality differences is between davinci resolve and the scratch system. I know one is free and the other is insanely expensive, but besides that how greately is the quality differences.
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  2. #2  
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    Resolve is a fully professional application - so quality is not an issue even with the free version.

    For full real time performance and ease of use in front of demanding clients it needs expensive hardware which puts the price considerably higher and comparable to some Scratch setups.

    If Scratch is insanely expensive for you, then you can choose Resolve Lite and be happy you have a free application which is comparable to the best of rivals in the industry, but don't expect the same realtime performance or ease of use at high resolutions.
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    Senior Member jake blackstone's Avatar
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    I don't see any difference between Scratch or Resolve from the point of view of hardware and performance. Both systems can be purchased as "software only" or a "full package" ready to rock on Linux side for Resolve. Both systems, or for that reason, ANY professional grading systems are full float, so the quality is exactly the same, when using a $300k Pablo, $5k Scratch or free Resolve.
    Frankly, I would be very careful investing in Scratch, as I personally have no idea what is their market audience. I don't think they have a market left.
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  4. #4  
    Scratch has always been more of a niche product. I've almost bought into it in the past a couple times, but have never pulled the trigger. Their cost to get into the drivers seat vs. my perceived value of the platform just never aligned with my projects I guess. There are quite a few people using Scratch, but nowhere near as many as there are using Resolve or other coloring/ finishing solutions.

    I guess the only thing I would say about Scratch, or any software you may consider, is that you should try and familiarize yourself with its purpose and have a good idea of how you want it to operate within your workflows. Scratch is a very capable tool, but like Jake says above, I'm not so sure who their current audience is.
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    Senior Member Nick Pasquariello's Avatar
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    I will add, partially tangentially, that Scratch Play is a great $5. Plays just about anything, with more of a professional focus than a consumer focus (like VLC). For 5 bucks, to have it on set, or even in whatever post setup you've got, it's a neat little tool in the toolbelt.
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  6. #6  
    Personally I think BM will with the race. Not many understood what they where about when they bought Davinchi. But by now it's quite clear. Give away a top shelf software solution for free that runs on pretty much any hardware then make money from the paraphernalia like graphics cards, converters, consoles etc. As long as Resolve is on par with the rest, which it very much is, This strategy collects a huge client base, all the way from student and up to high level professionals, and as with any software it does not really cost much to sell two copies of it instead of one. So they beat the rest of the market and the little money they get in per unit for the paid for version and the paraphernalia is more than enough to keep the developing going at the same time as they steal seats from the competion. So pretty much no matter how you look at it, it's quite clear that BM is pretty much beating the shit out of the competition for the moment and it does not look like there is anything that will change the situation any time soon. The only thing would be if BM was bought out by Auto desk or any other giant. But I doubt that will happen any time soon as Autodesk are very much trying their best to stay away from hardware and I think BM just letting go of resolve alone will not happen.

    One of these days I might even might consider to use it :)
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member mikeburton's Avatar
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    I for one use both products regularly. There are some basic compositing features that you can access in Scratch that really allow me to bring value to certain shows that require it all in one software package and in realtime. I actually really enjoy the flexibility that it offers compared to Resolve in these areas. For example if i need to quickly remove a boom mic, or do some basic beauty work on an actress etc. Now that Resolve 10 has OFX plugin support some of these features that Scratch had a leg up on the competition are diminishing a bit. Still, its like any other tool you get to know really well, you find yourself going back to it for the small things it does that assist you and your clients needs. Its assisted us on set as well as in the studio.
    I'm not a salesman either way, I think they are both very worthy tools that can spit out fantastic imagery when coupled with talented people behind the controls. If you want to see Some of the tools i was referring to in action i have a couple tutorials which are now free to watch here http://cmivfx.com/store/485-assimila...ing+techniques
    These were done on Scratch 6 but the info is still quite relevant.
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  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeburton View Post
    I for one use both products regularly. There are some basic compositing features that you can access in Scratch that really allow me to bring value to certain shows that require it all in one software package and in realtime. I actually really enjoy the flexibility that it offers compared to Resolve in these areas. For example if i need to quickly remove a boom mic, or do some basic beauty work on an actress etc. Now that Resolve 10 has OFX plugin support some of these features that Scratch had a leg up on the competition are diminishing a bit. Still, its like any other tool you get to know really well, you find yourself going back to it for the small things it does that assist you and your clients needs. Its assisted us on set as well as in the studio.
    I'm not a salesman either way, I think they are both very worthy tools that can spit out fantastic imagery when coupled with talented people behind the controls. If you want to see Some of the tools i was referring to in action i have a couple tutorials which are now free to watch here http://cmivfx.com/store/485-assimila...ing+techniques
    These were done on Scratch 6 but the info is still quite relevant.
    But Mike if you had 30k USD today and needed to setup a grading suite what would be your pick? And if you had a young assistant on your side and you wanted to advice him what to learn for the future... Then I at least would tell him to look trough the Resolve tutorials and skip scratch, would you not?
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member mikeburton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Björn Benckert View Post
    But Mike if you had 30k USD today and needed to setup a grading suite what would be your pick? And if you had a young assistant on your side and you wanted to advice him what to learn for the future... Then I at least would tell him to look trough the Resolve tutorials and skip scratch, would you not?
    Its an interesting question, Bjorn. I think the answer is quite obvious in that price range for sure in favor of Resolve. I also think having quality monitoring, calibration, and enough hardware to keep up with your clients demands in realtime as well as a client friendly environment is more important than which software you decide to adopt in your suite, be it Resolve, SpeedGrade, Scratch, etc. I have very good things to say about all of those software products and their respective companies through years of interaction. It also depends what my primary type of work that comes in requires ie if the majority of my jobs require some compositing tricks as well as color Scratch may be better suited for my type of work than Resolve. Or vice versa, if I'm mostly just doing Color Grading than perhaps Resolve is a better fit.
    For example, I put a film called "BloodLine" into a limited theatrical release in Regal Cinemas this last fall. When we were doing the grade there were opportunities we noticed that we could help certain shots that I could do very quickly in Scratch that I either couldn't do at all in Resolve or would be VERY time consuming. In this instance i knew i needed the flexibility of Scratch to get the job done and keep those options open. In total there were 84 shots that required some quick touch ups with the compositing features in Scratch. That may not seem like a ton of work but if I had to take all those shots out of Scratch to perform the boom removals, and object replacements then that would have required more time and perhaps the VFX team who was already too far spread for time to complete within the films finishing budget.
    You also have to take into account the money that you will be making with the software you choose and what that looks like for the year/s or simply your ROI. I know a few houses that use Scratch besides ours and some independent owner operators as well. So, its all relevant to time, money and your given needs, now and in the future. For some, Resolve is the best bet, for others Scratch.
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  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeburton View Post
    Its an interesting question, Bjorn. I think the answer is quite obvious in that price range for sure in favor of Resolve. I also think having quality monitoring, calibration, and enough hardware to keep up with your clients demands in realtime as well as a client friendly environment is more important than which software you decide to adopt in your suite, be it Resolve, SpeedGrade, Scratch, etc. I have very good things to say about all of those software products and their respective companies through years of interaction. It also depends what my primary type of work that comes in requires ie if the majority of my jobs require some compositing tricks as well as color Scratch may be better suited for my type of work than Resolve. Or vice versa, if I'm mostly just doing Color Grading than perhaps Resolve is a better fit.
    For example, I put a film called "BloodLine" into a limited theatrical release in Regal Cinemas this last fall. When we were doing the grade there were opportunities we noticed that we could help certain shots that I could do very quickly in Scratch that I either couldn't do at all in Resolve or would be VERY time consuming. In this instance i knew i needed the flexibility of Scratch to get the job done and keep those options open. In total there were 84 shots that required some quick touch ups with the compositing features in Scratch. That may not seem like a ton of work but if I had to take all those shots out of Scratch to perform the boom removals, and object replacements then that would have required more time and perhaps the VFX team who was already too far spread for time to complete within the films finishing budget.
    You also have to take into account the money that you will be making with the software you choose and what that looks like for the year/s or simply your ROI. I know a few houses that use Scratch besides ours and some independent owner operators as well. So, its all relevant to time, money and your given needs, now and in the future. For some, Resolve is the best bet, for others Scratch.
    Yes, I see what you say.
    But with all that in mind I think it will not pass to many NAB's before BM add VFX nodes to their toolset. As they have all ready improved their timeline quite a bit and when they have that nailed down good then the only natural step for them is to add more composting tools. Again I do not use any of these products on a daily basis and i do not even have a scratch license. But I think the trend is that for most competing softwares and setups it's usually the one that is let out for the lowest price that wins in the long run. Or the one that is easy to download as a crack, as that usually build the bigger client base and in the long run sells more. That goes for FCP vs Avid, 3DSMAX vs Maya and many many more... From where I'm sitting that is quite obviously so that Shake wins over Flame as for the same reasons. But as I'm an old dog that hardly learn something new I stick with my flame, but that does not mean that I would recomend it over Nuke for a guy that strats out from scratch... i.e not the software, but the beginning :)
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